IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diwrup/35de.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Wer studiert, ist informiert?: Studienentscheidungen und Informationsdefizite

Author

Listed:
  • Frauke H. Peter
  • Vaishali Zambre

Abstract

Immer wieder wird die soziale Ungleichheit beim Übergang in die Hochschule thematisiert. Diese Debatte wird überwiegend aus der Perspektive der Chancengerechtigkeit geführt. Weniger diskutiert werden die ökonomische Fehlallokation von Ressourcen und die damit verbundene Ineffizienz. Dass Studienberechtigte aus nicht-akademischen Familien, bei gleicher Leistung, signifikant seltener ein Studium aufnehmen als ihre Mitschüler aus Elternhäusern mit akademischem Abschluss, ist keine optimale Nutzung von Bildungspotenzialen. Im Hinblick auf den demographischen Wandel und den damit verbundenen Rückgang im Erwerbspersonenpotenzial benötigen wir ein tieferes Verständnis über die Wirkungszusammenhänge bei Bildungsentscheidungen, um alle Bildungspotenziale auszuschöpfen. Dabei sollte die Rolle von Informationen stärker berücksichtigt und untersucht werden.

Suggested Citation

  • Frauke H. Peter & Vaishali Zambre, 2014. "Wer studiert, ist informiert?: Studienentscheidungen und Informationsdefizite," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 35, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwrup:35de
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.481316.de/DIW_Roundup_35_de.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Loyalka, Prashant & Song, Yingquan & Wei, Jianguo & Zhong, Weiping & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Information, college decisions and financial aid: Evidence from a cluster-randomized controlled trial in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 26-40.
    2. Christopher Avery & Thomas J. Kane, 2004. "Student Perceptions of College Opportunities. The Boston COACH Program," NBER Chapters, in: College Choices: The Economics of Where to Go, When to Go, and How to Pay For It, pages 355-394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Taryn Dinkelman & Claudia Martínez A., 2014. "Investing in Schooling In Chile: The Role of Information about Financial Aid for Higher Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(2), pages 244-257, May.
    4. Viktor Steiner & Katharina Wrohlich, 2012. "Financial Student Aid and Enrollment in Higher Education: New Evidence from Germany," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(1), pages 124-147, March.
    5. Philip Oreopoulos & Ryan Dunn, 2013. "Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(1), pages 3-26, January.
    6. Johanna Storck, 2013. "Hochschulstudium: nicht ausgeschöpfte Potentiale trotz "Akademisierungswahn"," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 2, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Glocker, Daniela & Steiner, Viktor, 2011. "Returns to Education across Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 8568, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Susan Dynarski, 2002. "The Behavioral and Distributional Implications of Aid for College," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 279-285, May.
    9. Judith Scott-Clayton, 2012. "Information Constraints and Financial Aid Policy," NBER Working Papers 17811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Michael S. Kofoed, 2017. "To Apply or Not to Apply: FAFSA Completion and Financial Aid Gaps," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 58(1), pages 1-39, February.
    11. Marty McGuigan & Sandra McNally & Gill Wyness, 2012. "Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign," CEE Discussion Papers 0139, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    12. Robert Jensen, 2010. "The (Perceived) Returns to Education and the Demand for Schooling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(2), pages 515-548.
    13. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long & Philip Oreopoulos & Lisa Sanbonmatsu, 2012. "The Role of Application Assistance and Information in College Decisions: Results from the H&R Block Fafsa Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1205-1242.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zimmermann, Markus & Fitzenberger, Bernd & Osikominu, Aderonke, 2016. "Cohort Changes in Educational Pathways and Returns to Education," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145927, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:diw:diwrup:35de. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bibliothek). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/diwbede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.