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From the EU Savings Directive to the US FATCA, Taxing Cross Border Savings Income

Author

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  • Marcel GERARD

    () (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN and CESifo)

  • Lucia GRANELLI

    () (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

Abstract

This paper is motivated by the recent innovations regarding the taxation of cross-border savings that took place in the European Union and the United States. We develop a model to assess the functioning of the different systems of international taxation used on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. We consider agents as investors able to diversify their portfolio between countries and kinds of financial assets. Furthermore, we show the effects of the various settings investigated not only on the taxation of foreign savings income, but also on the tax rates applied to domestic savings. Finally, comparing the respective merits of diverse regimes of information exchange and coordinated withholding taxation, we explore the consequences of the loopholes in both the EU Savings Directive and the US Qualified Intermediary mechanism, and cope with the cost of information sharing. We find that only three tax designs ensure efficiency: a framework of taxation based on the principle of residence, perfect information exchange for all substitutable assets and strategies, and a system of withholding taxation where the residence country can choose the withholding tax rate and also receives all the withholding tax revenues collected abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcel GERARD & Lucia GRANELLI, 2013. "From the EU Savings Directive to the US FATCA, Taxing Cross Border Savings Income," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2013007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2013007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dharmapala, Dhammika, 2016. "Cross-border tax evasion under a unilateral FATCA regime," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 29-37.
    2. Marcelo Arbex & Sidney Caetano, 2016. "Welfare Implications of AEoI," Working Papers 1608, University of Windsor, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Taxation; Taxation of Personal Income; Savings Taxation; European Integration;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F55 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Institutional Arrangements

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