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Intimate partner violence and women 's health : the private and social burden

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  • Carrasco, Raquel
  • Alonso-Borrego, César

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women on both the victims' health and the healthcare system. We address this issue using Spanish data for 2011. Given the lack of a single data set including complete individual-level information on IPV and healthcare use, we undertake a stepwise proce- dure using two complementary and compatible data sets: the Violence Against Women Survey and the National Health Survey. To address potential endogeneity issues, we estimate bivariate models of health status, IPV and healthcare use, exploiting exoge- nous sources of variation in the data. Our results indicate that IPV experience makes it 18 percentage points more likely to be in any of the three worst health states and that it increases the probability of hospitalization, emergency care and sedative and/or antidepressant consumption by 3:7, 7 and 9:8 percentage points, respectively. According to these estimates, the percentage of the total cost of each of these health services for adult women that could be saved in the absence of IPV is around 0:44% of hospitalization expenditure, 0:84% of emergency care expenditure, and 1:18% of the sedative consumption. These results point out that the costs of IPV are borne by the wider economy and society, not only by the victims, as they entail a signi cant drain on healthcare resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Carrasco, Raquel & Alonso-Borrego, César, 2019. "Intimate partner violence and women 's health : the private and social burden," UC3M Working papers. Economics 29029, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:29029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karin Hederos Eriksson & Randi Hjalmarsson & Matthew J. Lindquist & Anna Sandberg, 2016. "The importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of crime," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 219-262, January.
    2. Anna Aizer, 2011. "Poverty, Violence, and Health: The Impact of Domestic Violence During Pregnancy on Newborn Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(3), pages 518-538.
    3. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Wechsler, Henry, 1997. "Price, tobacco control policies and smoking among young adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 359-373, June.
    4. Sunita Kishor & Kiersten Johnson, 2006. "Reproductive health and domestic violence: Are the poorest women uniquely disadvantaged?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 293-307, May.
    5. Manuel Arellano & Costas Meghir, 1992. "Female Labour Supply and On-the-Job Search: An Empirical Model Estimated Using Complementary Data Sets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(3), pages 537-559.
    6. Caoimhe Rice & Judit Vall Castelló, 2018. "Hit where it hurts – healthcare access and intimate partner violence," Working Papers 2018/22, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    7. César Alonso-Borrego & Raquel Carrasco, 2017. "Employment and the risk of domestic violence: does the breadwinner’s gender matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(50), pages 5074-5091, October.
    8. Fuchs, Victor R., 2004. "Reflections on the socio-economic correlates of health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 653-661, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogeneity;

    JEL classification:

    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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