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Measuring Household Vulnerability in the Context of Poverty Education: Evidence from Uganda

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  • Diego Angemi

    () (Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano)

Abstract

While it has long been demonstrated (Rosenzweig and Binswanger, 1993; Banerjee and Newman, 1994) that considerations of risk and uncertainty are key to understand the dynamics leading to and perpetuating poverty, it is only recently that policy makers have taken a more active interest in trying to incorporate considerations of risk and vulnerability into their strategies to reduce poverty (Christiaensen and Subbarao, 2001). The aim of this paper is to quantify the severity of vulnerability by generating the first quantitative assessment of vulnerability in Uganda, a country at the forefront of poverty analysis. The findings support the hypothesis that during the past decade, alongside sharp reductions in poverty, vulnerability to poverty in Uganda declined from 57% in 1992/93 to 25% in 1999/00. Such results highlight the importance for policy makers to distinguish between the effective implementation of poverty-prevention and poverty-reduction programmes.

Suggested Citation

  • Diego Angemi, 2011. "Measuring Household Vulnerability in the Context of Poverty Education: Evidence from Uganda," Development Working Papers 317, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 17 Oct 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:317
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    File URL: http://www.dagliano.unimi.it/media/WP2011_317.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850.
    2. Atkinson, A B, 1987. "On the Measurement of Poverty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 749-764, July.
    3. Hoddinott, John & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2003. "Methods for microeconometric risk and vulnerability assessments," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 29138, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Poverty; Vulnerability; Risk; Consumption Expenditure;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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