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The Dynamics of Efficiency and Productivity Growth in U. S. Electric Utilities

  • Supawat Rungsuriyawiboon

    (Chiang Mai University)

  • Spyro Stefanou

    (Pennsylvania State University)

This study recognizes explicitly the efficiency gain or loss as a source in explaining the growth. A theoretically consistent method to estimate the decomposition of dynamic total factor productivity growth (TFP) in the presence of inefficiency is developed which is constructed from an extension of the dynamic TFP growth, adjusted for deviations from the long-run equilibrium within an adjustment cost framework. The empirical case study is to U.S. electric utilities, which provides a measure to evaluate how different electric utilities participate in the deregulation of electricity generation. TFP grew by 2.26 percent per annum with growth attributed to the combined scale effects of 0.34 percent, the combined efficiency effects of 0.69 percent, and the technical change effect of 1.22 percent. The dynamic TFP grew by 1.66 percent per annum for electric utilities located within states with the deregulation plan and 3.30 percent per annum for those located outside. Electric utilities located within states with the deregulation plan increased the outputs by improving technical and input allocative efficiencies more than those located outside of states with deregulation plans.

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File URL: http://economics.soc.uoc.gr/wpa/docs/Dynamics_of_Effic_&_Prod_Growth.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Crete, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0711.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 00 Jul 2004
Date of revision: 00 Aug 2006
Handle: RePEc:crt:wpaper:0711
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  1. Cornwell, Christopher & Schmidt, Peter & Sickles, Robin C., 1989. "Production Frontiers With Cross-Sectinal And Time-Series Variation In Efficiency Levels," Working Papers 89-18, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  2. Timothy J. Considine, 2000. "Cost Structures for Fossil Fuel-Fired Electric Power Generation," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 83-104.
  3. Kira R. Fabrizio & Nancy L. Rose & Catherine D. Wolfram, 2007. "Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on US Electric Generation Efficiency," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(4), pages 1250-1277, September.
  4. McLaren, Keith R & Cooper, Russel J, 1980. "Intertemporal Duality: Application to the Theory of the Firm," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(7), pages 1755-62, November.
  5. Epstein, Larry G & Denny, Michael G S, 1983. "The Multivariate Flexible Accelerator Model: Its Empirical Restrictions and an Application to U.S. Manufacturing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(3), pages 647-74, May.
  6. Jeffrey I. Bernstein & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Panos Pashardes, 2004. "Technical Efficiency and U.S. Manufacturing Productivity Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 402-412, February.
  7. Supawat Rungsuriyawiboon & Spiro E. Stefanou, 2003. "Dynamic Efficiency Estimation: An Application to US Electric Utilities," CEPA Working Papers Series WP052003, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  8. Paul W. Bauer, 1988. "Decomposing TFP growth in the presence of cost inefficiency, nonconstant returns to scale, and technological progress," Working Paper 8813, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  9. Markiewicz, K. & Rose, N.L. & Wolfram, C., 2004. "Does Competition Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0472, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  10. Epstein, Larry G, 1981. "Duality Theory and Functional Forms for Dynamic Factor Demands," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 81-95, January.
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