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2000 Families: identifying the research potential of an origins-of migration studies

Author

Listed:
  • Ayse Guveli

    () (University of Essex)

  • Harry Ganzeboom

    () (Free University Amsterdam)

  • Helen Baykara-Krumme

    () (Chemnitz University of Technology)

  • Lucinda Platt

    () (London School of Economics and Political Science)

  • Şebnem Eroğlu

    () (University Bristol)

  • Niels Spierings

    () (Radboud University Nijmegen)

  • Sait Bayrakdar

    () (University of Essex)

  • Efe K Sozeri

    () (Free University Amsterdam)

  • Bernhard Nauck

    () (Chemnitz University of Technology)

Abstract

Despite extensive recent advances in the empirical and theoretical study of migration, certain critical areas in the analysis of European migration remain relatively underdeveloped both theoretically and empirically. Specifically, we lack studies that both incorporate an origin comparison and trace processes of intergenerational transmission across migrants over multiple generations and incorporating family migration trajectories. This paper outlines the development, data and design of such a study, the 2000 Families study, framed within a theoretical perspective of ‘dissimilation’ from origins and over generations. We term the study an origins-of-migration study, in that it captures the country of origin, the family origins and potentially the originating causes of migration processes and outcomes. The resulting data comprised nearly 2,000 migrant and non-migrant Turkish families with members across three or more generations, covering. 50,000 individuals. We reflect on the potential of this study for migration research.

Suggested Citation

  • Ayse Guveli & Harry Ganzeboom & Helen Baykara-Krumme & Lucinda Platt & Şebnem Eroğlu & Niels Spierings & Sait Bayrakdar & Efe K Sozeri & Bernhard Nauck, 2014. "2000 Families: identifying the research potential of an origins-of migration studies," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1435, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1435
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Dustmann, 2008. "Return Migration, Investment in Children, and Intergenerational Mobility: Comparing Sons of Foreign- and Native-Born Fathers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(2), pages 299-324.
    2. Emilio Parrado & S. Morgan, 2008. "Intergenerational fertility among hispanic women: New evidence of immigrant assimilation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(3), pages 651-671, August.
    3. Torkild Lyngstad & Alexia Prskawetz, 2010. "Do siblings’ fertility decisions influence each other?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(4), pages 923-934, November.
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    5. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Gianandrea Lanzara, 2012. "Educational achievement of second‐generation immigrants: an international comparison," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(69), pages 143-185, January.
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    7. George J. Borjas, 1992. "Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 123-150.
    8. Lina Andersson & Mats Hammarstedt, 2010. "Intergenerational transmissions in immigrant self-employment: Evidence from three generations," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 261-276, April.
    9. Ayse Guveli & Lucinda Platt, 2011. "Understanding the religious behaviour of Muslims in the Netherlands and the UK," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 858.11, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    10. Koser, Khalid, 2007. "International Migration: A Very Short Introduction," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199298013.
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    Keywords

    Migration; Europe; Turkey; dissimilation; intergenerational transmission; originsof-migration study;

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