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Human Capital, Growth and Inequality in Transition Economies

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  • Spagat, Michael

Abstract

Transition economies have an initial condition of high human capital relative to living standards. I explore the possible implications of this key fact by surveying and adapting literature on growth and inequality. I focus especially on the long run and policy options.

Suggested Citation

  • Spagat, Michael, 2002. "Human Capital, Growth and Inequality in Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3556, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3556
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Münich & Jan Svejnar & Katherine Terrell, 2005. "Returns to Human Capital Under The Communist Wage Grid and During the Transition to a Market Economy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 100-123, February.
    2. Spagat, Michael, 2006. "Human capital and the future of transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 44-56, March.
    3. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Andrew F. Newman, 1991. "Risk-Bearing and the Theory of Income Distribution," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 211-235.
    4. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    5. Gros, Daniel & Suhrcke, Marc, 2000. "Ten years after : what is special about transition countries?," HWWA Discussion Papers 86, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    6. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    7. John Micklewright, 1999. "Education, inequality and transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 343-376, July.
    8. Alexeev, Michael & Kaganovich, Michael, 1998. "Returns to human capital under uncertain reform: Good guys finish last," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 53-70, September.
    9. Roberto Perotti, 1993. "Political Equilibrium, Income Distribution, and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(4), pages 755-776.
    10. Roland Bénabou, 1996. "Inequality and Growth," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1996, Volume 11, pages 11-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1998. "New ways of looking at old issues: inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 259-287.
    12. Fan, Chengze Simon & Overland, Jody & Spagat, Michael, 1999. "Human Capital, Growth, and Inequality in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 618-643, December.
    13. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. MONEE project, 2001. "A Decade of Transition," Papers remore01/15, Regional Monitoring Report.
    14. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre. MONEE project, 2000. "Young People in Changing Societies," Papers remore00/13, Regional Monitoring Report.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova, 2006. "Access to Secondary Education in Albania: Incentives, Obstacles, and Policy Spillovers," SSE Riga/BICEPS Research Papers 2006-1, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies (BICEPS);Stockholm School of Economics in Riga (SSE Riga).
    2. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova & Olga Rastrigina, 2008. "Ethnic and parental effects on schooling outcomes before and during the transition: evidence from the Baltic countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 719-749, July.
    3. Alexander Muravyev, 2006. "Human Capital Externalities: Evidence from the Transition Economy of Russia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 629, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    constraints; educational reform; growth; human capital; inequality; liquidity; long run; transition economies;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies

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