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Colombia: Una Política De Tierras En Transición

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  • Banco Mundial

Abstract

La distribución inequitativa de la tierra y las implicaciones negativas tanto sociales como económicas resultado de la polarización en Colombia ha sido una preocupación constante para los formuladores de política debido a que la distribución inequitativa de la tierra es uno de los principales impedimentos clave al desarrollo económico y social del país. Se han adoptado una serie de medidas de política para enfrentar el problema y sus consecuencias. Numerosos estudios han mostrado que el éxito de estos programas fue limitado a causa de un marco político inadecuado, recursos financieros limitados, procedimientos engorrosos, cargados de obstáculos burocráticos, influencia de dinero del narcotráfico y violencia. Este estudio utiliza nueva evidencia empírica para describir la dimensión y el impacto del problema de acceso a la tierra, la distribución inequitativa de la misma, las políticas del pasado que trataron estos asuntos y los consecuentes problemas, con el fin de identificar posibles soluciones para encauzar asuntos de tierra de manera integral en futuras intervenciones. Entre los temas analizados son el papel de la política de tierra en enfrentar el desplazamiento forzado y el uso del mercado para facilitar el acceso a tierra a pequenos productores de manera que fomenta la productividad y competitividad agropecuaria.

Suggested Citation

  • Banco Mundial, 2004. "Colombia: Una Política De Tierras En Transición," Documentos CEDE 2146, Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Economía, CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:002146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Redistribución de la tierra;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions

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