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Optimal Communication

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  • Stephen Morris
  • Hyun Song Shin

Abstract

Optimal communication to a group often entails a trade-off between precision of information conveyed and common understanding (or approximate common knowledge) of the information within the group. We argue that an understanding of this trade-off is central in many contexts, including central bank communication and the design of accounting standards, as well as understanding the design of language itself. (JEL: C72, D83, E52, M41) (c) 2007 by the European Economic Association.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2006. "Optimal Communication," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000236, UCLA Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cla:levrem:321307000000000236
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    File URL: http://www.princeton.edu/%7Esmorris/pdfs/optcomm.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. George-Marios Angeletos & Alessandro Pavan, 2004. "Transparency of Information and Coordination in Economies with Investment Complementarities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 91-98, May.
    2. Camille Cornand & Frank Heinemann, 2008. "Optimal Degree of Public Information Dissemination," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 718-742, April.
    3. Espahbodi, Hassan & Espahbodi, Pouran & Rezaee, Zabihollah & Tehranian, Hassan, 2002. "Stock price reaction and value relevance of recognition versus disclosure: the case of stock-based compensation," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 343-373, August.
    4. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2002. "Social Value of Public Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1521-1534, December.
    5. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2005. "Central Bank Transparency and the Signal Value of Prices," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 36(2), pages 1-66.
    6. Mary E. Barth & Greg Clinch & Toshi Shibano, 2003. "Market Effects of Recognition and Disclosure," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 581-609, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • M41 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Accounting

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