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Network Structure in a Link-formation Game: An Experimental Study

  • Alexander Elbittar
  • Rodrigo Harrison
  • Roberto Muñoz

Network formation is frequently modeled using link-formation games and typically present a multiplicity of Nash equilibria. Cooperative refinements - such as strong or coalitional proof Nash equilibria - have been the standard tool used for equilibrium selection in these games. Non-cooperative refinements derived from the theory of global games have shown also that, for a class of payoff functions, multiplicity of equilibria disappears when the game is perturbed by introducing small amounts of incomplete information. We conducted a laboratory study evaluating the predictive power of each of these refinements in an illustrative link-formation game. Compared with cooperative game solutions, the global game approach did significantly better at predicting the strategies played by individuals in the experiment.

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Paper provided by David K. Levine in its series Levine's Working Paper Archive with number 122247000000001708.

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Date of creation: 19 Nov 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cla:levarc:122247000000001708
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  1. Falk Armin & Kosfeld Michael, 2012. "It's all about Connections: Evidence on Network Formation," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-36, September.
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  9. Dutta, B. & van den Nouweland, C.G.A.M. & Tijs, S.H., 2003. "Link formation in cooperative situations," Other publications TiSEM 840ac1d0-9e23-41a7-832e-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  10. Venkatesh Bala & Sanjeev Goyal, 2000. "A Noncooperative Model of Network Formation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1181-1230, September.
  11. Rodrigo Harrison & Roberto Muñoz, 2008. "Stability and equilibrium selection in a link formation game," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 37(2), pages 335-345, November.
  12. Frank Heinemann & Rosemarie Nagel & Peter Ockenfels, 2004. "The Theory of Global Games on Test: Experimental Analysis of Coordination Games with Public and Private Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(5), pages 1583-1599, 09.
  13. (*), Anne van den Nouweland & Marco Slikker, 2000. "original papers : Network formation models with costs for establishing links," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 5(3), pages 333-362.
  14. Antonio Cabrales & Rosemarie Nagel & Roc Armenter, 2007. "Equilibrium selection through incomplete information in coordination games: an experimental study," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 221-234, September.
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