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The Distribution of COVID-19 Related Risks

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick Baylis
  • Pierre-Loup Beauregard
  • Marie Connolly
  • Nicole Fortin
  • David A. Green
  • Pablo Gutiérrez-Cubillos
  • Samuel Gyetvay
  • Catherine Haeck
  • Tímea L. Molnár
  • Gäelle Simard-Duplain
  • Henry Siu
  • Maria teNyenhuis
  • Casey Warman

Abstract

This paper documents two COVID-related risks, viral risk and employment risk, and its distribution across the Canadian population. The measurement of viral risk is based on the VSE COVID Risk/Reward Assessment Tool, created to assist policymakers in determining the impacts of economic shutdowns and re-openings over the course of the pandemic. We document that COVID-related risks are not distributed equally. Women work in occupations with greater viral risk, even after accounting for greater female representation in health-related occupations. Employment losses since the pandemic have disproportionately impacted women, those with less education, and recent immigrants. Viral and employment risks are correlated. Employment losses have been greater in occupations that measure higher in viral risk. This interacts with and helps account for the greater em-ployment loss experienced by economically marginalized groups. Finally, we study labour market adjustments resulting in increased “employed by absent from work” status, working from home, and assortative mating in terms of viral risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Baylis & Pierre-Loup Beauregard & Marie Connolly & Nicole Fortin & David A. Green & Pablo Gutiérrez-Cubillos & Samuel Gyetvay & Catherine Haeck & Tímea L. Molnár & Gäelle Simard-Duplain & Henr, 2020. "The Distribution of COVID-19 Related Risks," CIRANO Working Papers 2020s-50, CIRANO.
  • Handle: RePEc:cir:cirwor:2020s-50
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    File URL: https://cirano.qc.ca/files/publications/2020s-50.pdf
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    Other versions of this item:

    • Patrick Baylis & Pierre-Loup Beauregard & Marie Connolly & Nicole Fortin & David A. Green & Pablo Gutierrez Cubillos & Sam Gyetvay & Catherine Haeck & Timea Laura Molnar & Gaëlle Simard-Duplain & Henr, 2020. "The Distribution of COVID-19 Related Risks," NBER Working Papers 27881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Alex W. Chernoff & Casey Warman, 2020. "COVID-19 and Implications for Automation," NBER Working Papers 27249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bellatin, Alejandra & Galassi, Gabriela, 2022. "What COVID-19 May Leave Behind: Technology-Related Job Postings in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 15209, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Maryna Tverdostup, 2021. "Gender Gaps in Employment, Wages, and Work Hours: Assessment of COVID-19 Implications," wiiw Working Papers 202, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Pierre Brochue & Jonathan Créchet, 2021. "Survey Non-response in Covid-19 Times: The Case of the Labour Force Survey," Working Papers 2109E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    5. Alejandra Bellatin & Gabriela Galassi, 2022. "What COVID-19 May Leave Behind: Technology-Related Job Postings in Canada," Staff Working Papers 22-17, Bank of Canada.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; Risks; Employment; Canada;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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