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The fiscal impact of immigration in France: a generational accounting approach

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  • Xavier Chojnicki

Abstract

The objective of this study is to use both static and dynamic frameworks to compare the benefits that immigrants draw from the public system with their contributions through the taxes that they pay. The main conclusion of this article is that the impact of immigration on welfare systems is weak. Thus, if we compare, on a given date, immigrants’ global contribution to the public administration budget with the volume of transfers they receive, immigrants appear to be relatively favored by the redistribution system. At the same time, even if immigrants seem to pay less taxes and receive more transfers than natives, the difference in distribution between the two populations, with a higher concentration of immigrants in the active age groups and a sparser concentration among the net beneficiaries of the social transfer system, leads to a slightly positive long-term impact of immigration on public finances. However, the impact of immigration remains very slight compared to the global effort that would have to be undertaken to reduce budgetary imbalances.

Suggested Citation

  • Xavier Chojnicki, 2012. "The fiscal impact of immigration in France: a generational accounting approach," Working Papers 2012-11, CEPII research center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2012-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karin Mayr, 2005. "The Fiscal Impact of Immigrants in Austria – A Generational Accounting Analysis," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 181-216, June.
    2. Timothy Miller & Ronald Lee, 2000. "Immigration, Social Security, and Broader Fiscal Impacts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 350-354, May.
    3. Karin Mayr, 2004. "The fiscal impact of immigrants in Austria--a generational accounting analysis," Economics working papers 2004-09, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Holger Bonin & Bernd Raffelhüschen & Jan Walliser, 2000. "Can Immigration Alleviate the Demographic Burden?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(1), pages 1-1, September.
    5. M. Dolores Collado & IÒigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe & Guadalupe Valera, 2004. "Quantifying the Impact of Immigration on the Spanish Welfare State," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 11(3), pages 335-353, May.
    6. Olivier Monso, 2008. "L'immigration a-t-elle un effet sur les finances publiques ?," Revue Française d'Économie, Programme National Persée, vol. 23(2), pages 3-56.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Ben-Gad, 2013. "Public Deficit Bias and Immigration," 2013 Meeting Papers 21, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Giovanni Facchini & Cora Signorotto, 2015. "Population, Migration, Ageing and Health: A Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1518, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Xavier Chojnicki & Lionel Ragot, 2011. "Impacts of Immigration on Aging Welfare-State An Applied General Equilibrium Model for France," Working Papers 2011-13, CEPII research center.
    4. Aubry, Amandine & Burzyński, Michał & Docquier, Frédéric, 2016. "The welfare impact of global migration in OECD countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 1-21.
    5. Holger Hinte, 2014. "What determines the net fiscal effects of migration?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-78, June.
    6. Ben-Gad, M., 2012. "On deficit bias and immigration," Working Papers 12/09, Department of Economics, City University London.
    7. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0105-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; International migration; National budget;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H6 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt

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