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Cognitive Reflection Test: Whom, how, when

Author

Listed:
  • Pablo Brañas-Garza

    () (Middlesex University London)

  • Praveen Kujal

    (Middlesex University London)

  • Balint Lenkei

    (Middlesex University London)

Abstract

We report the results of a meta-study of 118 Cognitive Reflection Test studies comprising of 44,558 participants across 21 countries. There is a negative correlation between being female and the overall, and individual, correct answers to CRT questions. Taking the test at the end of an experiment negatively impacts performance. Monetary incentives do not impact performance. Overall students perform better compared to non-student samples. Exposure to CRT over the years may impact outcomes, however, the effect is driven by online studies. We obtain mixed evidence on whether the sequence of questions matters. Finally, we find that computerized tests marginally improve results.

Suggested Citation

  • Pablo Brañas-Garza & Praveen Kujal & Balint Lenkei, 2015. "Cognitive Reflection Test: Whom, how, when," Working Papers 15-25, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:chu:wpaper:15-25
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    Cited by:

    1. Nobuyuki Hanaki & Nicolas Jacquemet & Stéphane Luchini & Adam Zylbersztejn, 2016. "Fluid intelligence and cognitive reflection in a strategic environment: evidence from dominance-solvable games," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" hal-01359231, HAL.
    2. Brice Corgnet & Mark Desantis & David Porter, 2016. "What Makes a Good Trader? On the Role of Intuition and Reflection on Trader Performance," Working Papers halshs-01364432, HAL.
    3. repec:eee:soceco:v:74:y:2018:i:c:p:18-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Peter Hoeschler & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2017. "The Relative Importance of Personal Characteristics for the Hiring of Young Workers," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0142, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Jan 2018.
    5. Marcello Sartarelli, 2016. "Handedness, Ability, Earnings and Risk. Evidence from the Lab," Working Papers. Serie AD 2016-04, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    6. Jimenez, Natalia & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Tyran, Jean-Robert & Wengström, Erik, 2018. "Thinking fast, thinking badly," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 41-44.
    7. Judit Alonso & Roberto Di Paolo & Giovanni Ponti & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Some (Mis)facts about 2D:4D, Preferences and Personality," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-08, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    8. repec:eee:soceco:v:72:y:2018:i:c:p:121-134 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:eee:eecrev:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:72-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Smith, John, 2016. "Cognitive abilities and economic behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-4.
    11. Noussair, Charles N. & Tucker, Steven & Xu, Yilong, 2016. "Futures markets, cognitive ability, and mispricing in experimental asset markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 166-179.
    12. repec:jdm:journl:v:13:y:2018:i:3:p:246-259 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Valerio Capraro & Brice Corgnet & Antonio M. Espin & Roberto Hernán-Gonzalez, 2017. "Deliberation favours social efficiency by making people disregard their relative shares: Evidence from US and India," Post-Print halshs-01439121, HAL.
    14. Bradley Ruffle, Anne Wilson, 2017. "Tat will tell: Tattoos and time preferences," LCERPA Working Papers 0106, Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis, revised 01 Dec 2017.
    15. repec:eee:eecrev:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:167-184 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Alós-Ferrer, Carlos & Hügelschäfer, Sabine, 2016. "Faith in intuition and cognitive reflection," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 61-70.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CRT; Experiments; Gender; Incentives; Glucose and Cognition;

    JEL classification:

    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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