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Foreign Bank Entry and Business Volatility: Evidence from U.S. States and Other Countries

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  • Donald P. Morgan
  • Philip E. Strahan

Abstract

The first-order effects of relaxed bank entry restrictions have been favorable, both within the U.S. and across countries. Internationally, the benefits of foreign entry seem to depend on the level of development, but at least for developing nations entrants are more efficient than incumbent banks and the stiffer competition seems to improve overall bank efficiency. In contrast to these first-order effects, the stability implications of increased entry are less obvious. This paper investigates whether greater integration resulting from foreign bank entry has been associated with more or less business cycle volatility. We approach the topic with mix of theory and evidence from both the U.S. states and countries. While theoretical effects are mixed, the empirical effect of relaxation of restrictions of cross-state banking has been to stabilize state-level fluctuations in the U.S. Applying a related set of tests to a panel of about 100 countries, however, we find no evidence that expansion of foreign banking has reduced business fluctuations. If anything, the evidence points tentatively in the other direction.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald P. Morgan & Philip E. Strahan, 2003. "Foreign Bank Entry and Business Volatility: Evidence from U.S. States and Other Countries," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 229, Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:229
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    Cited by:

    1. Ralph de Haas & Ilko Naaborg, 2005. "Internal Capital Markets in Multinational Banks: Implications for European Transition Countries," DNB Working Papers 051, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. De Haas, Ralph & Naaborg, Ilko, 2006. "Foreign banks in transition countries. To whom do they lend and how are they financed?," MPRA Paper 6320, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Alpanda, Sami & Aysun, Uluc, 2014. "International transmission of financial shocks in an estimated DSGE model," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 21-55.
    4. Xue, Minggao & Cheng, Wen, 2013. "National culture, market condition and market share of foreign bank," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 991-997.
    5. Zeynep Ozkok, 2016. "Financial Harmonization and Financial Development: An Application of Europe’s Financial Services Action Plan," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot GmbH, Berlin, vol. 62(1), pages 1-35.
    6. Arturo Galindo & Alejandro Micco & Andrew Powell, 2004. "Loyal Lenders or Fickle Financiers: Foreign Banks in Latin America," Business School Working Papers banksla, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    7. Meriem Haouat & Diego N. Moccero & Ramiro Sosa Navarro, 2012. "Foreign Banks and Credit Volatility: The Case of Latin American Countries," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 1017-1033, November.
    8. Fotios Pasiouras, 2008. "International evidence on the impact of regulations and supervision on banks’ technical efficiency: an application of two-stage data envelopment analysis," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 187-223, February.
    9. Fotios Pasiouras & Chrysovalantis Gaganis & Michael Doumpos, 2007. "A multicriteria discrimination approach for the credit rating of Asian banks," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 351-367, July.
    10. de Haas, Ralph & van Lelyveld, Iman, 2010. "Internal capital markets and lending by multinational bank subsidiaries," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 1-25, January.
    11. Mohamed Azzim Gulamhussen & Carlos Pinheiro & Alberto Franco Pozzolo, 2010. "Do multinational banks create or destroy economic value?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 36, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    12. Ralph de Haas, 2006. "Monitoring Costs and Multinational-Bank Lending," DNB Working Papers 088, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    13. Laivi Laidroo, 2014. "Lending Growth and Cyclicality in Central and Eastern European Banks," TUT Economic Research Series 13, Department of Finance and Economics, Tallinn University of Technology.
    14. Chad P. Bown & Daniel Lederman & Samuel Pienknagura & Raymond Robertson, 2017. "Better Neighbors," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 25736.
    15. Fotios Pasiouras & Chrysovalantis Gaganis & Constantin Zopounidis, 2006. "The impact of bank regulations, supervision, market structure, and bank characteristics on individual bank ratings: A cross-country analysis," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 403-438, December.
    16. repec:eee:ecmode:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:159-173 is not listed on IDEAS

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    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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