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China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection

Author

Listed:
  • Austin Strange
  • Bradley Parks
  • Michael J. Tierney
  • Andreas Fuchs
  • Axel Dreher
  • Vijaya Ramachandran

Abstract

How big is China’s aid to Africa? Does it complement or undermine the efforts of traditional donors? China releases little information, and outside estimates of the size and nature of Chinese aid vary widely. In an effort to overcome this problem, AidData, based at the College of William and Mary, has compiled a database of thousands of media reports on Chinese-backed projects in Africa from 2000 to 2011. The database includes information on 1,673 projects in 51 African countries and on $75 billion in commitments of official finance. This paper describes the new database methodology, key findings, and possible applications of the data, which is being made publicly available for the first time. The paper and database offer a new tool set for researchers, policymakers, journalists, and civil-society organizations working to understand China’s growing role in Africa. The paper also discusses the challenges of quantifying Chinese development activities, introduces AidData’s Media-Based Data Collection (MBDC) methodology, provides an overview of Chinese development finance in Africa as tracked by this new database, and discusses the potential and limitations of MBDC as a resource for tracking development finance. This working paper accompanies the release of AidData’s Chinese Official Finance to Africa Dataset, Version 1.0, available for download at http://china.aiddata.org/datasets/1.0, and a live, interactive database platform (at http://china.aiddata.org). AidData’s MBDC methodology is also available for download at http://china.aiddata.org/MBDC_codebook.

Suggested Citation

  • Austin Strange & Bradley Parks & Michael J. Tierney & Andreas Fuchs & Axel Dreher & Vijaya Ramachandran, 2013. "China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection," Working Papers 323, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:323
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dreher, Axel & Nunnenkamp, Peter & Thiele, Rainer, 2011. "Are ‘New’ Donors Different? Comparing the Allocation of Bilateral Aid Between nonDAC and DAC Donor Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 1950-1968.
    2. Yin‐Wong Cheung & Jakob de Haan & Xingwang Qian & Shu Yu, 2012. "China's Outward Direct Investment in Africa," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 201-220, May.
    3. Idean Salehyan & Cullen S. Hendrix & Jesse Hamner & Christina Case & Christopher Linebarger & Emily Stull & Jennifer Williams, 2012. "Social Conflict in Africa: A New Database," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 503-511, September.
    4. Yongzheng Yang & Nkunde Mwase, 2012. "BRICs’ Philosophies for Development Financing and their Implications for LICs," IMF Working Papers 12/74, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:4:p:567-586 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Martyn Davies & Peter Draper & Hannah Edinger, 2014. "Changing China, Changing Africa: Future Contours of an Emerging Relationship," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 9(2), pages 180-197, July.
    3. Fuchs, Andreas & Dreher, Axel & Hodler, Roland & Parks, Bradley C. & Raschky, Paul, 2015. "Aid on Demand: African Leaders and the Geography of China s Foreign Assistance," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112838, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:241-252 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Justin Yifu LIN & Yan WANG, 2015. "China’s Contribution to Development Cooperation: Ideas, Opportunities and Finances," Working Papers P119, FERDI.
    6. Lin, Justin Yifu & Wang, Yan, 2014. "China-Africa co-operation in structural transformation: Ideas, opportunities, and finances," WIDER Working Paper Series 046, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Demir, Firat, 2016. "Effects of FDI Flows on Institutional Development: Does It Matter Where the Investors are from?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 341-359.
    8. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:529-549 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Megersa, kelbesa & Cassimon, Danny, 2016. "Debt Sustainability and direction of trade: What does Africa’s shifting engagement with BRIC and OECD tells us?," MPRA Paper 76581, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Solomon Hsiang & Nitin Sekar, 2016. "Does Legalization Reduce Black Market Activity? Evidence from a Global Ivory Experiment and Elephant Poaching Data," NBER Working Papers 22314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Wako, Hassen, 2016. "Aid, institutions and economic growth: Heterogeneous parameters and heterogeneous donors," MERIT Working Papers 009, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. repec:eee:ememar:v:33:y:2017:i:c:p:1-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Hernandez, Diego, 2015. "Are “New” Donors Challenging World Bank Conditionality?," Working Papers 0601, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    14. repec:eee:chieco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:180-207 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Marcoux, Christopher & Parks, Bradley C. & Peratsakis, Christian M. & Roberts, J. Timmons & Tierney, Michael J., 2013. "Environmental and Climate Finance in a New World: How Past Environmental Aid Allocation Impacts Future Climate Aid," WIDER Working Paper Series 128, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Isaksson, Ann-Sofie & Kotsadam, Andreas, 2016. "Chinese aid and local corruption," Working Papers in Economics 667, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2016.
    17. Muchapondwa, Edwin & Mukanjari, Samson, 2014. "Understanding Chinese and Western development finance in Uganda, South Africa, and Zimbabwe," WIDER Working Paper Series 087, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    18. World Bank Group, 2015. "Global Economic Prospects, June 2015," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21999.
    19. Furukawa, Mitsuaki, 2014. "Management of the International Development Aid System Aid System and the Creation of Political Space for China:The Case of Tanzania," Working Papers 82, JICA Research Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; development finance; foreign aid; non-DAC donors; emerging donors; southsouth cooperation; media-based data collection.;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F54 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Colonialism; Imperialism; Postcolonialism
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy

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