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.Ground-truthing. Chinese development finance in Africa: Field evidence from South Africa and Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Muchapondwa, Edwin
  • Nielson, Daniel
  • Parks, Bradley
  • Strange, Austin M.
  • Tierney, Michael J.

Abstract

A new methodology, Tracking Under-Reported Financial Flows (TUFF), allows us to systematically gather open-source information—e.g. news reports, case studies, project inventories from embassy websites, and grant and loan data published by recipient governments—about Chinese development finance activities in Africa that can be updated and improved through crowd-sourcing. In this study we create and field-test a replicable ‘ground-truthing’ methodology following an established protocol to verify and update existing data with in-person interviews on Chinese development finance and site visits in Uganda and South Africa. Ground-truthing generally revealed close agreement between open-source data and answers to protocol questions from informants with official roles in the Chinese-funded projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Muchapondwa, Edwin & Nielson, Daniel & Parks, Bradley & Strange, Austin M. & Tierney, Michael J., 2014. ".Ground-truthing. Chinese development finance in Africa: Field evidence from South Africa and Uganda," WIDER Working Paper Series 031, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2014-031
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2014-031.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dreher, Axel & Nunnenkamp, Peter & Thiele, Rainer, 2011. "Are ‘New’ Donors Different? Comparing the Allocation of Bilateral Aid Between nonDAC and DAC Donor Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 1950-1968.
    2. Konstantinos Drakos, 2007. "The size of under-reporting bias in recorded transnational terrorist activity," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(4), pages 909-921.
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    Cited by:

    1. Isaksson, Ann-Sofie & Kotsadam, Andreas, 2018. "Chinese aid and local corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 146-159.
    2. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Parks, Bradley & Strange, Austin M. & Tierney, Michael J., 2016. "Apples and Dragon Fruits: The Determinants of Aid and Other Forms of State Financing from China to Africa," Working Papers 0620, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    3. Kitano, Naohiro & Harada, Yukinori, 2014. "Estimating China’s Foreign Aid 2001-2013," Working Papers 78, JICA Research Institute.
    4. repec:spr:revint:v:12:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11558-017-9270-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:revint:v:12:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11558-017-9273-4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; aid; development finance; Africa; data collection; ground-truthing;

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