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Health Effects of Occupational Change

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  • Olga Lazareva

    () (Stockholm School of Economics and Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR), Moscow)

Abstract

Rapidly changing technologies and the growing openness of economies to international trade sometimes make entire occupations in the countries affected redundant. People employed in these occupations have to switch to other occupations that they do not necessarily like. Such “forced” occupational change causes stress, which can be harmful to their health. The effect of people losing their profession on their health has not been previously studied. This paper is intended to fill the gap. I study the effect of occupational change on health and health-related behavior using data from Russia’s economic transition, which was characterized by massive occupational mobility. The results show that “forced” occupational change has a significant negative effect on individual health; it also increases smoking and alcohol consumption. These results survive a number of robustness checks.

Suggested Citation

  • Olga Lazareva, 2009. "Health Effects of Occupational Change," Working Papers w0129, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  • Handle: RePEc:cfr:cefirw:w0129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Костлявая рука рынка
      by (author unknown) in ДНЕВНИК ЭКОНОМИСТА on 2010-02-01 05:15:01

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    Cited by:

    1. Irina Denisova, 2009. "Mortality in Russia: Microanalysis," Working Papers w0128, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    2. Irina Denisova, 2010. "Adult mortality in Russia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(2), pages 333-363, April.
    3. Irina Denisova, 2009. "Mortality in Russia: Microanalysis," Working Papers w0128, New Economic School (NES).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    occupational change; health; smoking; alcohol;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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