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Occupational Change and the Demand for Skill, 1940-1990

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  • Murphy, Kevin M
  • Welch, Finis

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Suggested Citation

  • Murphy, Kevin M & Welch, Finis, 1993. "Occupational Change and the Demand for Skill, 1940-1990," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 122-136, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:83:y:1993:i:2:p:122-36
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Handel, Michael J., 2003. "Implications of Information Technology for Employment, Skills, and Wages: A Review of Recent Research," MPRA Paper 80077, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mehta, Aashish & Mohr, Belinda Acuña, 2012. "Economic Liberalization and Rising College Premiums in Mexico: A Reinterpretation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1908-1920.
    3. Darius Lakdawalla, 2001. "The Declining Quality of Teachers," NBER Working Papers 8263, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Olga Lazareva, 2009. "Health Effects of Occupational Change," Working Papers w0129, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    5. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    6. Keane, Michael P. & Todd, Petra E. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 2011. "The Structural Estimation of Behavioral Models: Discrete Choice Dynamic Programming Methods and Applications," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    7. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2005. "Can a More Nuanced View of Skill Biased Technological Change Explain the Recent Changes in Wage Inequality ?," Reflets et perspectives de la vie économique, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(2), pages 37-45.
    8. Hirasuna, Donald P. & Pulver, Glen C., 1998. "The Income Effects of Public Subsidies to Traded Services," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 28(3), pages 43-64, Winter.
    9. Avner Ahituv & Marta Tienda, 2004. "Employment, Motherhood, and School Continuation Decisions of Young White, Black, and Hispanic Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 115-158, January.
    10. Iñaki Iriondo & Teodosio Pérez-Amaral, 2013. "The Effect of Educational Mismatch on Wages Using European Panel Data," Working Papers 700, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.

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