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Estimation of the Russia’s trade policy options with the help of the Computable General Equilibrium Model

  • Alexander Alekseev

    ()

    (New Economic School/CEFIR)

  • Natalia Tourdyeva

    ()

    (CEFIR, NES)

  • Ksenia Yudaeva

    (CSR, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, NES)

The computable general equilibrium model was used in assessing different Russia’s trade policy options. The base experiment lying in the core of our investigation is simulation of the EU eastward enlargement. According to our calculations Russia does not loose in the resulting equilibrium. This is not a zero-sum process from a point of view of Russia’s social welfare. The other experiments are: simulation of Russia’s WTO accession and creation of the Common European Economic Space. Change in the tariffs associated with the possible WTO accession is so small relative to the existing level of tariffs, that it does not give a significant change in the Russian economic environment. Significant changes are associated with the creation of the CEES as a free trade area between Russia and the enlarged Europe. If an FTA agreement will cover all goods and services, this will give a negative effect on the Russian economy.

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Paper provided by Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR) in its series Working Papers with number w0042.

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Length: 62 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfr:cefirw:w0042
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  1. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1993. "The Politics of Free Trade Agreements," NBER Working Papers 4597, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Sonin, Konstantin, 2010. "Provincial protectionism," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 111-122, June.
  3. Hellman, Joel S. & Jones, Geraint & Kaufmann, daniel, 2000. ""Seize the state, seize the day": state capture, corruption, and influence in transition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2444, The World Bank.
  4. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1994. "Protection for Sale," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 833-50, September.
  5. Konstantin Sonin, 2003. "Why the Rich May Favor Poor Protection of Property Rights," Working Papers w0022, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  6. Edward L. Glaeser & Andrei Shleifer, 2002. "The Injustice of Inequality," NBER Working Papers 9150, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Timothy Besley & Stephen Coate, 2003. "Elected Versus Appointed Regulators: Theory and Evidence," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1176-1206, 09.
  8. Cai, Hongbin & Treisman, Daniel, 2004. "State corroding federalism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 819-843, March.
  9. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1994. "Politicians and Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(4), pages 995-1025, November.
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