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Gender Equality in Muslim-Majority Countries

Author

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  • Moamen Gouda
  • Niklas Potrafke

    ()

Abstract

Discrimination has been documented against women in Muslim-majority countries. Constitutions differ among Muslim-majority countries. By using women’s rights indicators and exploiting cross-country variation, we find that discrimination against women is more pronounced in countries where Islam is the source of legislation. Constitutions changed in only four Muslim-majority countries since 1980. We discuss anecdotal evidence to what extent women’s rights changed as a consequence of new constitutions. Empirical studies should thus distinguish between types of Muslim-majority countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Moamen Gouda & Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Gender Equality in Muslim-Majority Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 5883, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5883
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    as


    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Policies against human trafficking: the role of religion and political institutions," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 353-386, November.
    2. repec:sae:pubfin:v:46:y:2018:i:2:p:249-275 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Arye L. Hillman & Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Economic Freedom and Religion: An Empirical Investigation," CESifo Working Paper Series 6017, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender equality; countries with Muslim majority; Al-Azhar’s Islamic constitution;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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