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Why Don't Migrants with Secondary Education Return?

  • Renata Ivanova
  • Byeongju Jeong

The paper attempts to explain a U-shaped pattern of return migration rates with respect to educational attainment. We develop a two period OLG model with emigration and return migration decisions undertaken by agents heterogeneous in terms of educational attainment. The immigration policy is considered as an additional determinant for the migration decision. The model predicts that the combination of two forces - relative returns to schooling and uncertain opportunities for status adjustment - results in favorable conditions for migrants with secondary education to remain abroad permanently.

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File URL: http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp449.pdf
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Paper provided by The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague in its series CERGE-EI Working Papers with number wp449.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp449
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  1. Barrett, Alan & Goggin, Jean, 2010. "Returning to the Question of a Wage Premium for Returning Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 4736, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Nekby, Lena, 2004. "The Emigration of Immigrants, Return vs. Onward Migration: Evidence from Sweden," Research Papers in Economics 2004:7, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  3. Matloob Piracha & Augustin de Coulon, 2003. "Self-Selection and the Performance of Return Migrants: the Source Country Perspective," CEP Discussion Papers dp0576, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Frederic, DOCQUIER & Hillel, RAPOPORT, 2007. "Silled migration : the perspectives of developing countries," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007017, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  5. Michèle V. K. Belot & Timothy J. Hatton, 2012. "Immigrant Selection in the OECD," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(4), pages 1105-1128, December.
  6. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2010. "Migration and Culture," IZA Discussion Papers 5123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Dustmann, Christian & Fadlon, Itzhak & Weiss, Yoram, 2011. "Return migration, human capital accumulation and the brain drain," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 58-67, May.
  8. Cynthia Feliciano, 2005. "Educational selectivity in U.S. Immigration: How do immigrants compare to those left behind?," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 131-152, February.
  9. Borjas, George J & Bratsberg, Bernt, 1996. "Who Leaves? The Outmigration of the Foreign-Born," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 165-76, February.
  10. Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2008. "Income Maximization and the Selection and Sorting of International Migrants," NBER Working Papers 13821, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Dean Yang, 2006. "Why Do Migrants Return to Poor Countries? Evidence From Philippine Migrants%u2019 Responses to Exchange Rate Shocks," NBER Working Papers 12396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Marco Manacorda & Carolina Sanchez-Paramo & Norbert Schady, 2005. "Changes in Returns to Education in Latin America: the Role of Demand and Supply of Skills," CEP Discussion Papers dp0712, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2005. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(2), pages 239-281, April.
  14. Ira N. Gang & Catherine Y. Co & Myeong-Su Yun, 1999. "Returns to Returning," Departmental Working Papers 199813, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  15. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
  16. Manon Domingues Dos Santos & Fabien Postel-Vinay, 2003. "Migration as a source of growth: The perspective of a developing country," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 161-175, 02.
  17. Karin Mayr & Giovanni Peri, 2008. "Return Migration as Channel of Brain Gain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0804, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  18. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2007. "Long-Run Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure: Narrowing, Widening, Polarizing," NBER Working Papers 13568, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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