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Returning to the Question of a Wage Premium for Returning Migrants

Author

Listed:
  • Barrett, Alan

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

  • Goggin, Jean

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

Abstract

Using data from a large-scale survey of employees in Ireland, we estimate the extent to which people who have emigrated from Ireland and returned earn more relative to comparable people who have never lived abroad. In so doing, we are testing the hypothesis that migration can be part of a process of human capital formation. We find through OLS estimation that returners earn 7 percent more than comparable stayers. We test for the presence of self-selection bias in this estimate but the tests suggest that the premium is related to returner status. The premium holds for both genders, is higher for people with post-graduate degrees and for people who migrated beyond the EU to the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The results show how emigration can be positive for a source country when viewed in a longer term context.

Suggested Citation

  • Barrett, Alan & Goggin, Jean, 2010. "Returning to the Question of a Wage Premium for Returning Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 4736, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4736
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    Cited by:

    1. Steffen Reinhold & Kevin Thom, 2013. "Migration Experience and Earnings in the Mexican Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(3), pages 768-820.
    2. Michal Burzynski, 2016. "Time, Space and Skills in Designing Migration Policy," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-12, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    3. Jackline Wahba, 2014. "Return migration and economic development," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 12, pages 327-349 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Alan Barrett & Irene Mosca, 2013. "The psychic costs of migration: evidence from Irish return migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 483-506, April.
    5. repec:eee:wdevel:v:95:y:2017:i:c:p:196-210 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Renata Ivanova & Byeongju Jeong, 2011. "Why Don't Migrants with Secondary Education Return?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp449, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    7. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2017. "Local Institutional Quality and Return Migration: Evidence from Vietnam," Working Papers in Economics 17/10, University of Waikato.
    8. Wei Sun, 2013. "The productivity of return migrants: the case of China’s “Sea Turtles”," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-19, December.
    9. Marco Di Cintio & Emanuele Grassi, 2016. "The returns to temporary migration: The case of Italian Ph.D.s," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/15, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    10. Bensassi, Sami & Jabbour, Liza, 2017. "Return Migration and Entrepreneurial Success: An Empirical Analysis for Egypt," GLO Discussion Paper Series 98, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    11. Saarela, Jan, 2015. "Worse than expected? Uncertainty and earnings subsequent to return migration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 28-30.
    12. Barrett, Alan & Mosca, Irene, 2012. "Exploring the Early-life Causes and Later-life Consequences of Migration through a Longitudinal Study on Ageing," IZA Discussion Papers 6878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Barrett, Alan & Bergin, Adele & FitzGerald, John & Lambert, Derek & McCoy, Daire & Morgenroth,Edgar & Siedschlag, Iulia & Studnicka, Zuzanna, 2015. "Scoping the Possible Economic Implications of Brexit on Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS48.
    14. Aguilar Esteva, Arturo Alberto, 2013. "Stayers and Returners: Educational Self-Selection among U.S. Immigrants and Returning Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 7222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. repec:ilo:ilowps:486992 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Jackline Wahba, 2015. "Selection, selection, selection: the impact of return migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 535-563, July.
    17. Ambrosini, J. William & Mayr, Karin & Peri, Giovanni & Radu, Dragos, 2012. "The Selection of Migrants and Returnees in Romania: Evidence and Long-Run Implications," IZA Discussion Papers 6664, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Cristian Bartolucci & Mathis Wagner & Claudia Villosio, 2013. "Who Migrates and Why?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 333, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    19. Susan Pozo, 2014. "Does the US Labor Market Reward International Experience?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 250-254, May.
    20. J. William Ambrosini & Karin Mayr & Giovanni Peri & Dragos Radu, 2011. "The Selection of Migrants and Returnees: Evidence from Romania and Implications," NBER Working Papers 16912, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Makulec, Agnieszka., 2014. "Philippines' bilateral labour arrangements on health-care professional migration : in search of meaning," ILO Working Papers 994869923402676, International Labour Organization.
    22. Fransen, Sonja & Ruiz, Isabel & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2017. "Return Migration and Economic Outcomes in the Conflict Context," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 196-210.
    23. Dustmann, Christian & Fadlon, Itzhak & Weiss, Yoram, 2011. "Return migration, human capital accumulation and the brain drain," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 58-67, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    return migration; Ireland; brain drain; brain circulation;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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