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Brain Drain or Brain Gain? Technology Diffusion and Learning On-the-job

  • Thomas Sampson
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    This paper develops a theory of technology transfer when technology is embodied in human capital and learning requires on-the-job communication between managers and workers. Patterns of knowledge diffusion depend on where high knowledge managers work and how much time they allocate to training workers. Managers appropriate the surplus training creates and in the open economy managers face a cross-country trade-off between labor costs and the value of knowledge transfer. Complementarity between country-wide efficiency and managerial knowledge makes learning more valuable in the North meaning that high knowledge managers choose to work in the North and globalization precipitates a brain drain of high knowledge Southern agents to the North. The brain drain reduces learning opportunities in the South and exacerbates cross-country knowledge differences.

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    Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1168.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1168
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