IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cdl/ucscec/qt6947v2f5.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Cycles and Instability in a Rock-Paper-Scissors Population Game: a Continuous Time Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Friedman, Daniel
  • Cason, Timothy N
  • Hopkins, Ed

Abstract

We report laboratory experiments that use new, visually oriented software to explore the dynamics of 3x3 games with intransitive best responses. Each moment, each player is matched against the entire population, here 8 human subjects. A "heat map" offers instantaneous feedback on current profit opportunities. In the continuous slow adjustment treatment, we see distinct cycles in the population mix. The cycle amplitude, frequency and direction are consistent with the standard learning models. Cycles are more erratic and higher frequency in the instantaneous adjustment treatment. Control treatments (using simultaneous matching in discrete time) replicate previous results that exhibit weak or no cycles. Average play is approximated fairly well by Nash equilibrium, and an alternative point prediction, "TASP" (Time Average of the Shapley Polygon), captures some regularities that Nash equilibrium misses. Copyright 2014, Oxford University Press.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Friedman, Daniel & Cason, Timothy N & Hopkins, Ed, 2012. "Cycles and Instability in a Rock-Paper-Scissors Population Game: a Continuous Time Experiment," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt6947v2f5, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucscec:qt6947v2f5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6947v2f5.pdf;origin=repeccitec
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Benaïm, Michel & Hofbauer, Josef & Hopkins, Ed, 2009. "Learning in games with unstable equilibria," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(4), pages 1694-1709, July.
    2. Cason, Timothy N. & Friedman, Daniel & Hopkins, Ed, 2010. "Testing the TASP: An experimental investigation of learning in games with unstable equilibria," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(6), pages 2309-2331, November.
    3. Hopkins, Ed, 1999. "A Note on Best Response Dynamics," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 29(1-2), pages 138-150, October.
    4. Hommes, Cars H. & Ochea, Marius I., 2012. "Multiple equilibria and limit cycles in evolutionary games with Logit Dynamics," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 434-441.
    5. Dan Friedman, 2010. "Equilibrium in Evolutionary Games: Some Experimental Results," Levine's Working Paper Archive 393, David K. Levine.
    6. Friedman, Daniel, 1996. "Equilibrium in Evolutionary Games: Some Experimental Results," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(434), pages 1-25, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mäs, Michael & Nax, Heinrich H., 2016. "A behavioral study of “noise” in coordination games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 195-208.
    2. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2015. "Unique Stationary Behavior," MPRA Paper 66179, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Benndorf, Volker & Martínez-Martínez, Ismael, 2017. "Perturbed best response dynamics in a hawk–dove game," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 61-64.
    4. repec:eee:phsmap:v:486:y:2017:i:c:p:455-464 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Wang, Zhijian & Zhu, Siqian & Xu, Bin, 2013. "A Comment on "Cycles and Instability in a Rock-Paper-Scissors Population Game: A Continuous Time Experiment"," MPRA Paper 51691, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Xu, Bin & Zhou, Hai-Jun & Wang, Zhijian, 2013. "Cycle frequency in standard Rock–Paper–Scissors games: Evidence from experimental economics," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 392(20), pages 4997-5005.
    7. James Pettit & Daniel Friedman & Curtis Kephart & Ryan Oprea, 2014. "Software for continuous game experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 17(4), pages 631-648, December.
    8. Benndorf, Volker & Martínez-Martínez, Ismael & Normann, Hans-Theo, 2016. "Equilibrium selection with coupled populations in hawk–dove games: Theory and experiment in continuous time," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 472-486.
    9. Zhijian Wang & Bin Xu, 2014. "Cycling in stochastic general equilibrium," Papers 1410.8432, arXiv.org.
    10. Mäs, Michael & Nax, Heinrich H., 2016. "A behavioral study of “noise” in coordination games," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65422, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences; experiments; learning; mixed equilibrium; continuous time;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:ucscec:qt6947v2f5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ecucsus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.