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Credit Rationing and Crowding Out During the Industrial Revolution

  • Voth, Joachim

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley in its series Department of Economics, Working Paper Series with number qt4qw3v8q6.

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Date of creation: 06 May 2005
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Handle: RePEc:cdl:econwp:qt4qw3v8q6
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  1. N. F. R. Crafts & C. K. Harley, 1992. "Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts-Harley view," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(4), pages 703-730, November.
  2. Peter L. Rousseau & Richard Sylla, 2001. "Financial Systems, Economic Growth, and Globalization," NBER Working Papers 8323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Quinn, Stephen, 2001. "The Glorious Revolution'S Effect On English Private Finance: A Microhistory, 1680 1705," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(03), pages 593-615, September.
  4. repec:cup:jechis:v:60:y:2000:i:03:p:842-846_00 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Raghuram G. Rajan & Luigi Zingales, 1996. "Financial Dependence and Growth," NBER Working Papers 5758, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(04), pages 803-832, December.
  7. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
  8. Temin, Peter, 2000. "A Response to Harley and Crafts," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(03), pages 842-846, September.
  9. Sussman, Nathan & Yafeh, Yishay, 2004. "Constitutions and Commitment: Evidence on the Relation Between Institutions and the Cost of Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 4404, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Jaffee, Dwight & Stiglitz, Joseph, 1990. "Credit rationing," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 16, pages 837-888 Elsevier.
  11. Temin, Peter & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2006. "Banking as an emerging technology: Hoare's Bank, 1702 1742," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 149-178, October.
  12. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-58, June.
  13. Peter Temin & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2004. "Riding the South Sea Bubble," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1654-1668, December.
  14. Hoffman, Philip T. & Postel-Vinay, Gilles & Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent, 2001. "Priceless Markets," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226348018, September.
  15. Quinn, Stephen, 1997. "Goldsmith-Banking: Mutual Acceptance and Interbanker Clearing in Restoration London," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 411-432, October.
  16. Clark, Gregory, 2001. "Debt, deficits, and crowding out: England, 1727 1840," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(03), pages 403-436, December.
  17. repec:cup:jechis:v:60:y:2000:i:03:p:819-841_00 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. Temin, Peter, 1997. "Two Views of the British Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(01), pages 63-82, March.
  19. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1984. "Why Was British Growth So Slow During the Industrial Revolution?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(03), pages 687-712, September.
  20. Heim, Carol E. & Mirowski, Philip, 1987. "Interest Rates and Crowding-Out During Britain's Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(01), pages 117-139, March.
  21. Mirowski, Philip, 1981. "The Rise (and Retreat) of a Market: English Joint Stock Shares in the Eighteenth Century," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(03), pages 559-577, September.
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