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Banking as an emerging technology: Hoare's Bank, 1702-1742

  • Peter Temin
  • Joachim Voth

London’s financial market underwent dramatic change after 1700. More limited than Paris or Amsterdam in the seventeenth century, London became the leading financial centre in Europe in the eighteenth century. There is an extensive and growing literature on the causes of this change, but comparatively little on the change itself. This article provides detailed information on the operation of the London financial market around 1700 by describing the operations of a nascent London bank.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra in its series Economics Working Papers with number 1263.

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Date of creation: Oct 2006
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Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:1263
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.upf.edu/

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  8. Hoffman, Philip T. & Postel-Vinay, Gilles & Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent, 1992. "Private Credit Markets in Paris, 1690–1840," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(02), pages 293-306, June.
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  10. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(04), pages 803-832, December.
  11. Epstein, Larry G & Wang, Tan, 1994. "Intertemporal Asset Pricing Under Knightian Uncertainty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 283-322, March.
  12. Alfred D. Chandler, 1969. "Strategy and Structure: Chapters in the History of the American Industrial Enterprise," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262530090, June.
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  15. Julian Hoppit, 1986. "Financial Crises in Eighteenth-century England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 39(1), pages 39-58, 02.
  16. Schnabel, Isabel & Shin, Hyun Song, 2001. "Foreshadowing LTCM: The Crisis of 1763," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 02-46, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  17. Quinn, Stephen, 1997. "Goldsmith-Banking: Mutual Acceptance and Interbanker Clearing in Restoration London," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 411-432, October.
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