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The past, present and future of banking history

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  • Colvin, Christopher L.

Abstract

This essay discusses trends in new banking history scholarship. It does so by conducting bibliometric content analysis of the entire literature involving the history of banks, bankers and banking published in all major academic journals since the year 2000. It places this recent scholarship in its historiographical context, and speculates on the future of the field.

Suggested Citation

  • Colvin, Christopher L., 2015. "The past, present and future of banking history," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:qucehw:1505
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bernardo Batiz-Lazo, 2017. "Between novelty and fashion.Risk management and the adoption of computers in retail banking," Working Papers 17001, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    banking history; bibliometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • N20 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N21 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N22 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N24 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N25 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Asia including Middle East

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