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The Bank of England

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  • Capie,Forrest

Abstract

This history of the Bank of England takes its story from the 1950s to the end of the 1970s. This period probably saw the peak of the Bank's influence and prestige, as it dominated the financial landscape. One of the Bank's central functions was to manage the exchange rate. It was also responsible for administering all the controls that made up monetary policy. In the first part of the period, the Bank did all this with a remarkable degree of freedom. But economic policy was a failure, and sluggish output, banking instability and rampant inflation characterised the 1970s. The pegged exchange rate was discontinued, and the Bank's freedom of movement was severely constrained, as new approaches to policy were devised and implemented. The Bank lost much of its freedom of movement but also took on more formal supervision.

Suggested Citation

  • Capie,Forrest, 2010. "The Bank of England," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521192828, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521192828
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bordo, Michael D., 2012. "Could the United States have had a better central bank? An historical counterfactual speculation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 597-607.
    2. Avner Offer, 2013. "Narrow banking, real estate, and financial stability in the UK, c.1870-2010," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _116, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Campbell, Gareth & Coyle, Christopher & Turner, John D., 2016. "This time is different: Causes and consequences of British banking instability over the long run," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 74-94.
    4. Michael Bordo & Pierre Siklos, 2014. "Central Bank Credibility, Reputation and Inflation Targeting in Historical Perspective," NBER Working Papers 20693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. BLANCHETON Bertrand, 2015. "Towards a tacit low-degree independence central banking model ?," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-17, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    6. Colvin, Christopher L., 2015. "The past, present and future of banking history," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-05, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    7. Eric Monnet, 2012. "Monetary policy without interest rates. Evidence from France’s Golden Age (1948-1973) using a narrative approach," Working Papers 0032, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    8. Hetzel, Robert L., 2013. "The Monetarist-Keynesian Debate and the Phillips Curve: Lessons from the Great Inflation," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 2Q, pages 83-116.
    9. William A Allen, 2012. "Government debt management and monetary policy in Britain since 1919," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Threat of fiscal dominance?, volume 65, pages 15-50 Bank for International Settlements.
    10. Gianni Toniolo & Eugene N. White, 2015. "The Evolution of the Financial Stability Mandate: From Its Origins to the Present Day," NBER Working Papers 20844, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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