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Bank Efficiency in China, Rent Seeking versus X-inefficiency: A non-parametric Bootstrapping Approach

Author

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  • Matthews, Kent

    () (Cardiff Business School)

  • Guo, Jianguang
  • Zhang, Nina
  • Wang, Lina

Abstract

This study demarcates cost-inefficiency in Chinese banks into X-inefficiency and rent-seeking-inefficiency. A protected banking market not only encourages weak management and X-inefficiency but also public ownership and state directed lending encourages moral hazard and bureaucratic rent seeking. This paper uses bootstrap non-parametric techniques to estimate measures of X-inefficiency and rent-seeking inefficiency for the 4 state owned banks and 11 joint-stock banks over the period 1997-2004. In contrast to other studies of the Chinese banking sector, the paper argues that reduced inefficiency is an indicator that the competitive threat of the opening up of the banking market in 2007 has produced tangible benefits in improved performance. This paper finds evidence of declining trend in both types of inefficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthews, Kent & Guo, Jianguang & Zhang, Nina & Wang, Lina, 2007. "Bank Efficiency in China, Rent Seeking versus X-inefficiency: A non-parametric Bootstrapping Approach," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2007/4, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section, revised Mar 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2007/4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. R. D. Banker & A. Charnes & W. W. Cooper, 1984. "Some Models for Estimating Technical and Scale Inefficiencies in Data Envelopment Analysis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(9), pages 1078-1092, September.
    2. David Hauner, 2005. "Explaining efficiency differences among large German and Austrian banks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(9), pages 969-980.
    3. Berger, Allen N. & Mester, Loretta J., 1997. "Inside the black box: What explains differences in the efficiencies of financial institutions?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(7), pages 895-947, July.
    4. Baumol, William J, 1982. "Contestable Markets: An Uprising in the Theory of Industry Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 1-15, March.
    5. Allen, Franklin & Qian, Jun & Qian, Meijun, 2005. "Law, finance, and economic growth in China," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 57-116, July.
    6. Chen, Xiaogang & Skully, Michael & Brown, Kym, 2005. "Banking efficiency in China: Application of DEA to pre- and post-deregulation eras: 1993-2000," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 229-245.
    7. Charnes, A. & Cooper, W. W. & Rhodes, E., 1978. "Measuring the efficiency of decision making units," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 2(6), pages 429-444, November.
    8. Berger, Allen N. & Hunter, William C. & Timme, Stephen G., 1993. "The efficiency of financial institutions: A review and preview of research past, present and future," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(2-3), pages 221-249, April.
    9. Fengxia Dong & Allen Featherstone, 2006. "Technical and Scale Efficiencies for Chinese Rural Credit Cooperatives: A Bootstrapping Approach in Data Envelopment Analysis," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 57-75.
    10. Shawna Grosskopf, 2003. "Some Remarks on Productivity and its Decompositions," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 459-474, November.
    11. Tser-Yieth Chen, 2001. "An estimation of X-inefficiency in Taiwan's banks," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 237-242.
    12. Drake, Leigh & Hall, Maximilian J. B., 2003. "Efficiency in Japanese banking: An empirical analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 891-917, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank Efficiency; China; X-inefficiency; DEA; Bootstrapping;

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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