IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Nonperforming Loans and Productivity in Chinese Banks, 1997-2006


  • Kent Matthews
  • Xu Zhang
  • Jianguang Guo


A bootstrap method for Malmquist index estimates of productivity growth is constructed with appropriate confidence intervals. This paper adjusts for the quality of the output by accounting for the nonperforming loans (NPLs) on balance sheets and tests the robustness of the results by examining alternative sets of outputs. The productivity growth of state-owned banks and joint-stock banks is compared, and the determinants are evaluated. It was found that the average productivity of Chinese banks improved modestly over this period. Adjusting for the quality of loans by treating NPLs as an undesirable output, the average productivity growth of the state-owned banks was zero or negative, while the productivity of the joint-stock banks was markedly higher.

Suggested Citation

  • Kent Matthews & Xu Zhang & Jianguang Guo, 2009. "Nonperforming Loans and Productivity in Chinese Banks, 1997-2006," Chinese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 30-47, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:chinec:v:42:y:2009:i:2:p:30-47

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Matthews, Kent & Guo, Jianguang & Zhang, Nina, 2007. "Rational Inefficiency and non-performing loans in Chinese Banking: A non-parametric Bootstrapping Approach," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2007/5, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    2. Alam, Ila M Semenick, 2001. "A Nonparametric Approach for Assessing Productivity Dynamics of Large U.S. Banks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 121-139, February.
    3. Mukherjee, Kankana & Ray, Subhash C. & Miller, Stephen M., 2001. "Productivity growth in large US commercial banks: The initial post-deregulation experience," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 913-939, May.
    4. Matthews, Kent & Guo, Jianguang & Zhang, Xu, 2008. "X-efficiency versus Rent Seeking in Chinese banks: 1997-2006," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2008/26, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kent Matthews & Zhiguo Xiao & Xu Zhang, 2009. "Rational Cost Inefficiency in Chinese Banks," Working Papers 292009, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    2. Chang, Tzu-Pu & Hu, Jin-Li & Chou, Ray Yeutien & Sun, Lei, 2012. "The sources of bank productivity growth in China during 2002–2009: A disaggregation view," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1997-2006.
    3. Kent Matthews & Nina Zhang, 2009. "Bank Productivity in China 1997-2007: An Exercise in Measurement," Working Papers 252009, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    4. Moradi-Motlagh, Amir & Babacan, Alperhan, 2015. "The impact of the global financial crisis on the efficiency of Australian banks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 397-406.
    5. Rasoul Rezvanian & Rima Turk Ariss & Seyed Mehdian, 2011. "Cost efficiency, technological progress and productivity growth of Chinese banking pre- and post-WTO accession," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(7), pages 437-454.
    6. He, Dong & Zhang, Wenlang, 2010. "How dependent is the Chinese economy on exports and in what sense has its growth been export-led?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 87-104, February.
    7. Jun Du & Sourafel Girma, 2011. "Cost economies, efficiency and productivity growth in the Chinese banking industry: evidence from a quarterly panel dataset," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 199-226, August.
    8. E. Nur Ozkan Gunay, 2012. "Risk Incorporation and Efficiency in Emerging Market Banks During the Global Crisis: Evidence from Turkey, 2002-2009," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(S5), pages 91-102, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:chinec:v:42:y:2009:i:2:p:30-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.