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Beneath the Surface: the Decline in Gender Injury Gap

  • Tiziano Razzolini
  • Roberto Leombruni
  • Giovanni Mastrobuoni
  • Mario Pagliero

There is little evidence on the joint evolution of gender differences in wages and other job amenities. We analyze gender differences in wages and workplace safety using 9 years of Italian administrative micro-level data. We document that a decline in the gender wage gap was accompanied by a narrowing of the gender gap in injury risk and an increased concentration of injuries among low-skilled female workers. A decomposition a la DiNardo et al. (1996) suggests that the main driver of the reduction in the wage gender gap is the sorting of workers across sectors and occupations, while the reduction in the injury gender gap and the increased concentration of injuries among low skilled female workers can be attributed to changes in unobservable job tasks and worker skills.

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File URL: http://www.carloalberto.org/assets/working-papers/no.286.pdf
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Paper provided by Collegio Carlo Alberto in its series Carlo Alberto Notebooks with number 286.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:286
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  2. Del Bono, Emilia & Vuri, Daniela, 2011. "Job mobility and the gender wage gap in Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 130-142, January.
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  11. Francine D. Blau, 1998. "Trends in the Well-Being of American Women, 1970-1995," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 112-165, March.
  12. DiNardo, John & Fortin, Nicole M & Lemieux, Thomas, 1996. "Labor Market Institutions and the Distribution of Wages, 1973-1992: A Semiparametric Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(5), pages 1001-44, September.
  13. Marigee P. Bacolod & Bernardo S. Blum, 2010. "Two Sides of the Same Coin: U.S. "Residual" Inequality and the Gender Gap," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
  14. Wagstaff, Adam & Paci, Pierella & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 1991. "On the measurement of inequalities in health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 545-557, January.
  15. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896, September.
  16. Altonji, Joseph G. & Blank, Rebecca M., 1999. "Race and gender in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 48, pages 3143-3259 Elsevier.
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