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Measuring the Effects of Socio-Economic Variables on the Income Distribution: An Application to the East German Transition Process


  • Martin Biewen


This paper develops a discrete variant of the semiparametric methodology of DiNardo, Fortin, and Lemieux (1996) (DFL) to measure the effects of socio-economic variables on the income distribution. Although the proposed method is also based on the calculation of hypothetical income distributions by reweighting the original population, it is much easier to implement. The framework is applied to examine the distributional effects of rising unemployment, decreasing female labor market participation, and widening income structure in East Germany following the reunification with West Germany in 1990. The empirical results suggest that both these tendencies contributed considerably to the recent increase in income inequality in East Germany. © 2000 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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  • Martin Biewen, 2001. "Measuring the Effects of Socio-Economic Variables on the Income Distribution: An Application to the East German Transition Process," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 185-190, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:83:y:2001:i:1:p:185-190

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joachim Frick & Jan Goebel, 2008. "Regional Income Stratification in Unified Germany Using a Gini Decomposition Approach," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 555-577.
    2. Afridi, Farzana & Dinkelman, Taryn & Mahajan, Kanika, 2016. "Why Are Fewer Married Women Joining the Work Force in India? A Decomposition Analysis over Two Decades," IZA Discussion Papers 9722, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Angela Fiedler & Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln, 2011. "Die ungleiche Entwicklung der Ungleichheit in Deutschland seit der Wiedervereinigung," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 18(03), pages 24-32, June.
    4. Razzolini, Tiziano & Leombruni, Roberto & Mastrobuoni, Giovanni & Pagliero, Mario, 2014. "Beneath the surface: The decline in gender injury gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 282-288.
    5. Usamah Fayez Al-Farhan, 2010. "A Detailed Decomposition of Changes in Wage Inequality in Reunified Post-transition Germany 1999-2006: Accounting for Sample Selection," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 269, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Carlo Vittorio FIORIO, 2008. "Understanding Italian inequality trends: a simulation-based decomposition," Departmental Working Papers 2008-26, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    7. Bauer, Thomas K. & Bender, Stefan, 2001. "Flexible Work Systems and the Structure of Wages: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 353, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Mary C. Daly & Robert G. Valletta, 2000. "Inequality and poverty in the United States: the effects of changing family behavior and rising wage dispersion," Working Paper Series 2000-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    9. Fortin, Nicole & Lemieux, Thomas & Firpo, Sergio, 2011. "Decomposition Methods in Economics," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    10. Becker, Gideon, 2015. "Econometric analysis of the wealth gap between East and West Germany," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 87, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    11. Martin Biewen, 2005. "The Covariance Structure of East and West German Incomes and its Implications for the Persistence of Poverty and Inequality," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(4), pages 445-469, November.
    12. Biewen, Martin, 2012. "Additive Decompositions with Interaction Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 6730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. D’Ambrosio, Anna & Leombruni, Roberto & Razzolini, Tiziano, 2017. "Native-Migrant Differences in Trading Off Wages and Workplace Safety," IZA Discussion Papers 10523, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln & Dirk Krueger & Mathias Sommer, 2010. "Inequality Trends for Germany in the Last Two Decades: A Tale of Two Countries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 103-132, January.
    15. Celso Nunes, 2008. "Poverty Measurement: The Development of Different Approaches and Its Techniques," Working Papers 93, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    16. David Black & Yi-Ping Tseng & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Examining the Role of Demographic Change in the Decline in Male Employment in Australia: A Propensity Score Re-weighting Decomposition Approach," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n24, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    17. Bauer, Thomas & Bender, Stefan, 2001. "Flexible Wages Systems and the Structure of Wages: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 2980, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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