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Resolving banking crises - an analysis of policy options

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  • Misa Tanaka
  • Glenn Hoggarth

Abstract

This paper develops a dynamic model to examine the ex-ante and ex-post implications of five policy options for resolving bank failures when the authorities cannot observe the level of non-performing loans (NPLs) held by individual banks. Under asymmetric information, we show that the first-best outcome is achievable when the authorities can close all banks that fail to raise a minimum level of new capital. But when the authorities cannot close banks and must rely on financial incentives to induce banks to liquidate their NPLs, recapitalisation using equity (Tier 1 capital) would be the second-best policy, whereas recapitalisation using subordinated debt (Tier 2 capital) is suboptimal. If the authorities do not wish to hold an equity stake in a bank, they should subsidise the liquidation of non-performing loans rather than inject subordinated debt. We also show that the cost of this subsidy can be reduced if it is offered in a menu that includes equity injection.

Suggested Citation

  • Misa Tanaka & Glenn Hoggarth, 2006. "Resolving banking crises - an analysis of policy options," Bank of England working papers 293, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:293
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    File URL: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/research/Documents/workingpapers/2006/WP293.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jenny Corbett & Janet Mitchell, 2000. "Banking crises and bank rescues: the effect of reputation," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 474-517.
    2. Glenn Hoggarth & Jack Reidhill & Peter Sinclair, 2004. "On the resolution of banking crises: theory and evidence," Bank of England working papers 229, Bank of England.
    3. Marc G Quintyn & David S. Hoelscher, 2003. "Managing Systemic Banking Crises," IMF Occasional Papers 224, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Mitchell, Janet, 2001. "Bad Debts and the Cleaning of Banks' Balance Sheets: An Application to Transition Economies," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 1-27, January.
    5. Philippe Aghion, Patrick Bolton & Steven Fries, 1999. "Optimal Design of Bank Bailouts: The Case of Transition Economies," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 155(1), pages 1-51, March.
    6. Osano, Hiroshi, 2002. "Managerial compensation contract and bank bailout policy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 25-49, January.
    7. Leslie E Teo & Charles Enoch & Carl-Johan Lindgren & Tomás J. T. Baliño & Anne Marie Gulde & Marc G Quintyn, 2000. "Financial Sector Crisis and Restructuring; Lessons from Asia: Lessons from Asia," IMF Occasional Papers 188, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Calomiris, Charles W., 1999. "Building an incentive-compatible safety net," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 1499-1519, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aikman, David & Nelson, Benjamin & Tanaka, Misa, 2015. "Reputation, risk-taking, and macroprudential policy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 428-439.
    2. Carlson, Mark A. & Rose, Jonathan D., 2016. "Can a Bank Run Be Stopped? Government Guarantees and the Run on Continental Illinois," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-3, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Hauck, Achim & Vollmer, Uwe, 2013. "Emergency liquidity provision to public banks: Rules versus discretion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 193-204.
    4. Pandey, Ashish, 2016. "High Bids and Low Recovery: A Possible Case for Non-Performing Loan Auctions in India," MPRA Paper 75254, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Hauck, Achim & Neyer, Ulrike & Vieten, Thomas, 2015. "Reestablishing stability and avoiding a credit crunch: Comparing different bad bank schemes," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 116-128.

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