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Banking crises and bank rescues: the effect of reputation


  • Jenny Corbett
  • Janet Mitchell


This paper focuses on bank rescue packages and on the behaviour of troubled banks in light of rescue offers. A puzzling feature of experience with banking crises is that in many cases policy authorities make offers of bank rescue, and banks are reluctant to accept these offers. We study situations in which regulators have decided to offer bank rescue plans, and we show that a combination of factors, including bankers' reputational concerns can explain banks' potential reluctance to accept offers of recapitalisation.
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  • Jenny Corbett & Janet Mitchell, 2000. "Banking crises and bank rescues: the effect of reputation," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 474-517.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcpr:y:2000:p:474-517

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Mitchell, Janet, 2001. "Bad Debts and the Cleaning of Banks' Balance Sheets: An Application to Transition Economies," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 1-27, January.
    2. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Joseba Martinez & Thomas Philippon, 2017. "Runs versus Lemons: Information Disclosure and Fiscal Capacity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1683-1707.
    3. Thomas Philippon & Vasiliki Skreta, 2012. "Optimal Interventions in Markets with Adverse Selection," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 1-28, February.
    4. Max Bruche & Gerard Llobet, 2010. "Walking Wounded or Living Dead? Making Banks Foreclose Bad Loans," Working Papers wp2010_1003, CEMFI.
    5. Thomas Philippon & Philipp Schnabl, 2013. "Efficient Recapitalization," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(1), pages 1-42, February.
    6. Misa Tanaka & Glenn Hoggarth, 2006. "Resolving banking crises - an analysis of policy options," Bank of England working papers 293, Bank of England.
    7. Hauck, Achim & Vollmer, Uwe, 2013. "Emergency liquidity provision to public banks: Rules versus discretion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 193-204.
    8. Hauck, Achim & Neyer, Ulrike & Vieten, Thomas, 2015. "Reestablishing stability and avoiding a credit crunch: Comparing different bad bank schemes," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 116-128.
    9. Jan Hanousek & Gerard Roland, 2001. "Banking Passivity and Regulatory Failure in Emerging Markets: Theory and Evidence from the Czech Republic," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp192, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    10. Alexeev, Michael & Kim, Sunghwan, 2008. "The Korean financial crisis and the soft budget constraint," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 178-193, October.
    11. Mayes, David G., 2004. "An approach to bank insolvency in transition and emerging economies," Research Discussion Papers 4/2004, Bank of Finland.
    12. K. Batu Tunay, 2010. "Banking Crises and Early Warning Systems: A Model Suggestion for Turkish Banking Sector," Journal of BRSA Banking and Financial Markets, Banking Regulation and Supervision Agency, vol. 4(1), pages 9-46.
    13. Dmitri Vinogradov, 2005. "Bailout Policy against Financial Intermediation Failures," Finance 0506003, EconWPA.
    14. Jimmy Melo, 2014. "Expectativas cambiarias, selección adversa y liquidez," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 27-62, May.
    15. García-Palacios, Jaime H. & Hasman, Augusto & Samartín, Margarita, 2014. "Banking crises and government intervention," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 32-42.
    16. Sorana Vătavu & Marilen Pirtea & Sorin Vătavu, 2011. "A Review of Financial Regulations to Avoid the Nationalisation of Losses in the Banking System," Annals of the University of Petrosani, Economics, University of Petrosani, Romania, vol. 11(1), pages 277-288.
    17. Mayes, David G., 2005. "Who pays for bank insolvency in transition and emerging economies?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 161-181, January.
    18. Imbierowicz, Björn & Rauch, Christian, 2014. "The relationship between liquidity risk and credit risk in banks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 242-256.
    19. YASUDA, Yukihiro, 2016. "Rollover and Capital Adequacy Requirements," Working Paper Series G-1-11, Center for Financial Research, Graduate School of Commerce and Management, Hitotsubashi University.

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