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Interactions among high-frequency traders

Author

Listed:
  • Benos, Evangelos

    () (Bank of England)

  • Brugler, James

    () (University of Cambridge, Faculty of Economics)

  • Hjalmarsson , Erik

    () (University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics)

  • Zikes , Filip

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

Using unique transactions data for individual high-frequency trading (HFT) firms in the UK equity market, we examine if the trading activity of individual HFT firms is contemporaneously and dynamically correlated with each other, and what impact this has on price efficiency. We find that HFT order flow exhibits significantly higher commonality than the order flow of a control group of investment banks, both within and across stocks. However, intraday HFT order flow commonality is associated with a permanent price impact, suggesting that commonality in HFT activity is information-based and so does not generally contribute to undue price pressure and price dislocations.

Suggested Citation

  • Benos, Evangelos & Brugler, James & Hjalmarsson , Erik & Zikes , Filip, 2015. "Interactions among high-frequency traders," Bank of England working papers 523, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0523
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Carrion, Allen, 2013. "Very fast money: High-frequency trading on the NASDAQ," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 680-711.
    6. Benos, Evangelos & Sagade, Satchit, 2016. "Price discovery and the cross-section of high-frequency trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 54-77.
    7. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
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    10. Alain P. Chaboud & Benjamin Chiquoine & Erik Hjalmarsson & Clara Vega, 2014. "Rise of the Machines: Algorithmic Trading in the Foreign Exchange Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(5), pages 2045-2084, October.
    11. P├ęter Kondor, 2009. "Risk in Dynamic Arbitrage: The Price Effects of Convergence Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(2), pages 631-655, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Nicola & Webber, Lewis & Noss, Joseph & Beale, Daniel & Crowley-Reidy, Liam, 2015. "Financial Stability Paper 34: The resilience of financial market liquidity," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 34, Bank of England.
    2. Benos, Evangelos & Sagade, Satchit, 2016. "Price discovery and the cross-section of high-frequency trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 54-77.
    3. Karvik, Geir-Are & Noss, Joseph & Worlidge, Jack & Beale, Daniel, 2018. "The deeds of speed: an agent-based model of market liquidity and flash episodes," Bank of England working papers 743, Bank of England.
    4. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:509-521 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    High-frequency trading; correlated trading strategies; price discovery;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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