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Speculative attacks, Private Signals and Intertemporal Trade-offs

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  • Nikola A Tarashev

Abstract

Confronted with a speculative attack on its currency peg, an authority weighs the short-term benefit of giving in and fine tuning the economy against the long-term benefit of credibility-enhancing resistance. In turn, speculators with heterogeneous beliefs face strategic uncertainty that peaks at the time of the attack, when the fate of the peg is unclear, and then declines, as the economy settles in a stable currency regime. In this environment, a less conservative authority - i.e. one that stabilises less the exchange rate once a peg is abandoned - may be more likely to withstand an attack on the peg. This result, which strengthens as speculators' risk aversion declines, casts doubt on the conventional wisdom that greater conservatism enhances welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Nikola A Tarashev, 2008. "Speculative attacks, Private Signals and Intertemporal Trade-offs," BIS Working Papers 254, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:254
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, December.
    6. Dasgupta, Amil, 2007. "Coordination and delay in global games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 134(1), pages 195-225, May.
    7. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, 1995. "The Mirage of Fixed Exchange Rates," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 73-96, Fall.
    8. Itay Goldstein & Ady Pauzner, 2005. "Demand–Deposit Contracts and the Probability of Bank Runs," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(3), pages 1293-1327, June.
    9. Maurice Obstfeld, 1994. "The Logic of Currency Crises," NBER Working Papers 4640, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Nikola A. Tarashev, 2007. "Speculative Attacks and the Information Role of the Interest Rate," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, March.
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    Keywords

    Global games of regime change; Strategic uncertainty; Coordination; Currency crises;

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