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A Comparison Of Two Methods For Estimating School Effects And Tracking Student Progress From Standardized Test Scores

  • Moshe Justman

    ()

    (BGU)

  • Brendan Houng

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne)

Registered author(s):

    This paper compares two leading approaches to analyzing standardized test data: leastsquares value-added analysis, used mainly to support accountability by identifying teacher and school effects; and Betebenner’s (2009) student growth percentiles method, which focuses on normative tracking of individual student progress. Applying both methods to analyze two-year progress in numeracy and reading in elementary and middle school, as reflected in Australian standardized test scores, we find that they produce similar quantitative indicators of both individual student progress and estimated school effects. This suggests that with minor modifications either methodology could be used for both purposes.

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    File URL: http://www.ec.bgu.ac.il/monaster/admin/papers/1316.pdf
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    Paper provided by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1316.

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    Length: 27 pages
    Date of creation: 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bgu:wpaper:1316
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    1. Timothy N. Bond & Kevin Lang, 2012. "The Evolution of the Black-White Test Score Gap in Grades K-3: The Fragility of Results," NBER Working Papers 17960, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rebecca Allen & Simon Burgess, 2011. "Can School League Tables Help Parents Choose Schools?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 245-261, 06.
    3. Dearden, Lorraine & Micklewright, John & Vignoles, Anna, 2011. "The Effectiveness of English Secondary Schools for Pupils of Different Ability Levels," IZA Discussion Papers 5839, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Cory Koedel & Mark Ehlert & Eric Parsons & Michael Podgursky, 2012. "Selecting Growth Measures for School and Teacher Evaluations," Working Papers 1210, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
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