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Income Taxation, Transfers and Labour Supply at the Extensive Margin

Author

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  • Benczúr, P.
  • Kátay, G.
  • Kiss, A.
  • Rácz , O.

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of income taxation and transfers on labour supply at the extensive margin, i.e., the labour force participation. We extend existing structural form methodologies by considering the effect of both taxes and transfers. Non-labour income contains the (hypothetical) transfer amount someone gets when out of work, while the wage is replaced by the difference between net wages and the amount of lost transfers due to taking up a job (gains to work). To incorporate these components of the budget set, we employ a detailed tax-benefit model. Using data from the Hungarian Household Budget Survey (HKF), we find that participation probabilities are strongly influenced by transfers and the gains to work, particularly for low-skill groups and the elderly. Moreover, the same change in the net wage leads to a much larger change in the gains to work for low earners, making them even more responsive to wages and taxation. Overall, we find that a single equation can capture a large heterogeneity of individual responsiveness to taxes and transfers. Our parametric estimates can be readily utilized in welfare evaluations, or microsimulation analyses of tax and transfer reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Benczúr, P. & Kátay, G. & Kiss, A. & Rácz , O., 2014. "Income Taxation, Transfers and Labour Supply at the Extensive Margin," Working papers 487, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:487
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Armando Barrientos & Alma Kudebayeva, 2015. "Social transfers and women’s labour supply in Kyrgyzstan," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 21515, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Zuzana Siebertova & Matus Senaj & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2013. "To Work or Not to Work? Estimates of Labour Supply Elasticities," Working and Discussion Papers WP 5/2013, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    3. Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2018. "The Evaluation of Fiscal Consolidation Strategies," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 11(3), pages 39-58.
    4. Michal Horvath & Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2018. "Evaluating the Aggregate Effects of Tax and Benefit Reforms," Working Papers Working Paper No. 1/2018, Council for Budget Responsibility.
    5. Michal Horvath & Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda, 2015. "The End of the Flat Tax Experiment in Slovakia," Discussion Papers 15/12, Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. repec:eee:ecmode:v:75:y:2018:i:c:p:441-457 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2016. "Labour Force Participation Elasticities: the Case of Slovakia," Working Papers Working Paper No. 1/2016, Council for Budget Responsibility.
    8. Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2016. "Labour force participation elasticities and the move away from a flat tax: the case of Slovakia," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-26, December.
    9. Kamil Galuscak & Gabor Katay, 2014. "Labour Force Participation and Tax-Benefit Systems: A Cross-Country Comparative Perspective," Working Papers 2014/10, Czech National Bank.
    10. Norbert Švarda & Jana Valachyová & Matúš Senaj & Michal Horváth & Zuzana Siebertová, 2018. "The end of the flat tax experiment in Slovakia: An evaluation using behavioural microsimulation linked with a dynamic macroeconomic framework," Discussion Papers 50, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    11. Kamil Galuscak & Petr Hlavac & Petr Jakubik, 2014. "Stress Testing the Private Household Sector Using Microdata," Working Papers 2014/02, Czech National Bank.
    12. Lars Calmfors & Giancarlo Corsetti & John Hassler & Gilles Saint-Paul & mult. Hans-Werner Sinn & Jan-Egbert Sturm & ÁkosValentinyi & Xavier Vives, 2012. "Chapter 5: The Hungarian Crisis," EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group Munich, vol. 0, pages 115-130, February.
    13. Gergely Baksay & Balázs Csomós, 2015. "Analysis of the Changes in the Hungarian Tax System and Social Transfers between 2010 and 2014 Using a Behavioural Microsimulation Model," Society and Economy, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 37(supplemen), pages 29-64, December.
    14. Kamil Galuščák & Petr Hlaváč & Petr Jakubík, 2016. "Household resilience to adverse macroeconomic shocks: evidence from Czech microdata," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 377-402, May.
    15. Norbert Švarda & Jana Valachyová & Matúš Senaj & Zuzana Siebertová, 2015. "To Work or Not to Work? Updated Estimates of Labour Supply Elasticities," Discussion Papers 32, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    participation decision; taxation; transfers.;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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