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Labour Force Participation Elasticities: the Case of Slovakia

Author

Listed:
  • Matus Senaj

    (Council for Budget Responsibility)

  • Zuzana Siebertova

    (Council for Budget Responsibility)

  • Norbert Svarda

    (Council for Budget Responsibility)

  • Jana Valachyova

    (Council for Budget Responsibility)

Abstract

This paper provides a microeconometric analysis of extensive margin labour force participation elasticities in Slovakia. Using a fully parametric framework, a probability model for participation in labour force is estimated. Our results show that low-skilled and females are the groups that are particularly responsive to changes in income taxes and transfers. We perform a microsimulation of two counterfactual scenarios of abolition of the flat tax regime and we demonstrate that abolishing flat-tax regime may differ in the impact on labour participation decisions. We find out that recent departure from flat tax system in Slovakia reduces the average probability of being economically active only negligible at the extensive margin. More significant average effect is found in the hypothetical scenario with similar fiscal revenue impact, simulating a departure from flat-tax system by reintroducing five tax brackets. Finally, we show that the impact on selected subgroups of population is different.

Suggested Citation

  • Matus Senaj & Zuzana Siebertova & Norbert Svarda & Jana Valachyova, 2016. "Labour Force Participation Elasticities: the Case of Slovakia," Working Papers Working Paper No. 1/2016, Council for Budget Responsibility.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbe:wpaper:201601
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kamil Galuscak & Gabor Katay, 2014. "Labour Force Participation and Tax-Benefit Systems: A Cross-Country Comparative Perspective," Working Papers 2014/10, Czech National Bank.
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    3. Moffitt, Robert A., 2002. "Welfare programs and labor supply," Handbook of Public Economics, in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 34, pages 2393-2430, Elsevier.
    4. Benczúr, P. & Kátay, G. & Kiss, A. & Rácz , O., 2014. "Income Taxation, Transfers and Labour Supply at the Extensive Margin," Working papers 487, Banque de France.
    5. Richard Blundell, 2012. "Tax Policy Reform: The Role Of Empirical Evidence," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 43-77, February.
    6. Robert Breunig & Joseph Mercante, 2010. "The Accuracy of Predicted Wages of the Non‐Employed and Implications for Policy Simulations from Structural Labour Supply Models," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(272), pages 49-70, March.
    7. Denvil Duncan & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2010. "Does labour supply respond to a flat tax?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(2), pages 365-404, April.
    8. Olivier Bargain & Kristian Orsini & Andreas Peichl, 2011. "Labor Supply Elasticities in Europe and the US," Working Papers 201114, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    9. Denis Beninger & Olivier Bargain & Miriam Beblo & Richard Blundell & Raquel Carrasco & Maria-Concetta Chiuri & François Laisney & Valérie Lechene & Ernesto Longobardi & Nicolas Moreau & Michal Myck & , 2006. "Evaluating the Move to a Linear Tax System in Germany and Other European Countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 159-180, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihály Szoboszlai & Zoltán Bögöthy & Pálma Mosberger & Dávid Berta, 2018. "Assessment of the tax and transfer changes in Hungary between 2010 and 2017 using a microsimulation model," MNB Occasional Papers 2018/135, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour force participation elasticity; Extensive margin; Micro-simulation; Flat-tax;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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