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Inequality in Belarus from 1995 to 2007

  • Maksim Yemelyanau

    (Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC) and Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education and the Economics Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (CERGE-EI))

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    Income and consumption inequality increased in all transition economies, albeit to very different levels. The existing literature suggests that countries that were slow to undertake pro-market reforms experienced the largest in- creases in inequality, with the notable exception of Belarus, one of the least reformed ex-Soviet republics, that nevertheless has inequality comparable to the most advanced and least unequal transition countries of Central Eu- rope. This paper studies the evolution of inequality in Belarus in 1995-2007, decomposes inequality by sources of income, and provides a comparison of Belarus and Ukraine, which suggests that the large difference in inequality is due to different income policies of the two countries: Belarus not only avoided mass privatization, but also kept many of the old-style Soviet social security features.

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    File URL: http://eng.beroc.by/webroot/delivery/files/WP1_eng_Yemelyanau.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    Paper provided by Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC) in its series BEROC Working Paper Series with number 01.

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    Length: 43 pages
    Date of creation: Apr 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bel:wpaper:01
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.beroc.by
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