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Growth and inequality: a demographicexplanation

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  • Kazutoshi Miyazawa

Abstract

Abstract This paper investigates the relationship between growth and inequality froma demographic point of view. In an extended model of the accidental bequest withendogenous fertility, we analyze the effects of a decrease in old-age mortality rate onthe equilibrium growth rate as well as on the income distribution. We show that therelationship between growth and inequality is at first positive and then may benegative in the process of population aging. The results are consistent with theempirical evidence in some developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazutoshi Miyazawa, 2006. "Growth and inequality: a demographicexplanation," STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers 87, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:stidar:87
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    File URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/darp/DARP87titlepage.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Dedry, Antoine & Onder, Harun & Pestieau, Pierre, 2017. "Aging, social security design, and capital accumulation," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 145-155.
    2. FUKUMURA Koichi & NAGAMACHI Kohei & SATO Yasuhiro & YAMAMOTO Kazuhiro, 2017. "Demographics, Immigration, and Market Size," Discussion papers 17103, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Ken Tabata, 2015. "Population Aging and Growth: The Effect of Pay-as-You-Go Pension Reform," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 71(3), pages 385-406, September.
    4. Maksim Yemelyanau, 2009. "Inequality in Belarus from 1995 to 2007," BEROC Working Paper Series 01, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
    5. Koichi Fukumura & Kohei Nagamachi & Yasuhiro Sato & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2017. "Demographics, Immigration, and Market Size," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1059, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    6. Ken Tabata, 2015. "Population Aging and Growth: the Effect of PAYG Pension Reform," Discussion Paper Series 125, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jan 2015.
    7. Wang, Xinxin & Chen, Kevin Z. & Robinson, Sherman & Huang, Zuhui, 2016. "Will China’s demographic transition exacerbate its income inequality? A CGE modeling with top-down microsimulation:," IFPRI discussion papers 1560, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Klaus Prettner, 2013. "Population aging and endogenous economic growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 811-834, April.
    9. Lin Shu-Chin & Huang Ho-Chuan & Kim Dong-Hyeon & Yeh Chih-Chuan, 2009. "Nonlinearity between Inequality and Growth," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-20, May.
    10. Marc Fleurbaey & Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière & Stéphane Zuber, 2017. "Premature Deaths, Accidental Bequests and Fairness," Cahiers de recherche 1704, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    11. Čobanović, Katarina & Nikolić-Đorić, Emilija & Mutavdžić, Beba, 2007. "Relation of Socio-Economic and Demographic Factors in Rural Development of Serbia," 100th Seminar, June 21-23, 2007, Novi Sad, Serbia and Montenegro 162339, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Koichi Fukumura & Kohei Nagamachi & Yasuhiro Sato & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2017. "Demographics, Immigration, and Market Size," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1048, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    13. Xinxin Wang & Kevin Z Chen, 2016. "Will China’s Demographic Transition Exacerbate Its Income Inequality? A CGE Modeling with Top-down Microsimulation," Working Papers id:11406, eSocialSciences.
    14. Marc Fleurbaey & Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière & Stéphane Zuber, 2017. "Premature Deaths, Accidental Bequests and Fairness," Cahiers de recherche 1704, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    15. Hung-Ju Chen, 2010. "Life expectancy, fertility, and educational investment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 37-56, January.
    16. Ito, Hiroyuki & Tabata, Ken, 2008. "Demographic structure and growth: The effect of unfunded social security," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 288-291, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; Growth; Fertility; Accidental bequest.;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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