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A Gini Decomposition Analysis of Inequality in the Czech and Slovak Republics during the Transition

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  • Garner, Thesia I
  • Terrell, Katherine

Abstract

Disposable income inequality, as measured by the Gini coefficient and using Family Budget Survey data, increased very little, and by a similar amount, from 1989–93 in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. This surprising result is examined with an analysis of changes in the channels of redistribution and a Gini decomposition. We find that the sizeable increase in overall inequality due to changes in the wage earnings component is mitigated by changes in the tax and transfer components in both republics. As for the relative effects of government policies, changes in the transfer component contributed more than changes in the tax component to lowering the growth of inequality in the Czech Republic, while the reverse was true for Slovakia.

Suggested Citation

  • Garner, Thesia I & Terrell, Katherine, 1998. "A Gini Decomposition Analysis of Inequality in the Czech and Slovak Republics during the Transition," CEPR Discussion Papers 1897, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1897
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, March.
    2. Kattuman, Paul & Redmond, Gerry, 1997. "Income Inequality in Hungary, 1987-1993," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9726, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Simon Commander & Andrei Tolstopiatenko & Ruslan Yemtsov, 1999. "Channels of redistribution: Inequality and poverty in the Russian transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 411-447, July.
    4. Thesia I. Garner & Katherine Terrell, 1997. "Changes in Distribution and Welfare in Transition Economies: Market vs. Policy in the Czech Republic and Slovakia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 77, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household Income; Inequality; Taxes; transfers; Transition;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • P30 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - General
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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