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R2 bounds for predictive models: what univariate properties tell us about multivariate predictability

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Wright

    (Birkbeck, University of London)

  • James Mitchell

    (Warwick Business School)

  • Donald Robertson

    (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

A longstanding puzzle in macroeconomic forecasting has been that a wide variety of multivariate models have struggled to out-predict univariate models consistently. We seek an explanation for this puzzle in terms of population properties. We derive bounds for the predictive R2 of the true, but unknown, multivariate model from univariate ARMA parameters alone. These bounds can be quite tight, implying little forecasting gain even if we knew the true multivariate model. We illustrate using CPI inflation data and the Eurozone in a specification motivated by a preferred-habitat model to test for monetary policy transmission domestically and internationally. Our findings suggest an impact of monetary policy on variance processes only and provides evidence for an international channel of monetary transmission on both money and capital markets. This is, to our knowledge, the first attempt to use search-engine data in the context of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Wright & James Mitchell & Donald Robertson, 2018. "R2 bounds for predictive models: what univariate properties tell us about multivariate predictability," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1804, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkefp:1804
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    File URL: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/26851
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua C. C. Chan, 2018. "Specification tests for time-varying parameter models with stochastic volatility," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 807-823, September.
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    3. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2007. "Erratum to "Why Has U.S. Inflation Become Harder to Forecast?"," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 1849-1849, October.
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    6. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2007. "Why Has U.S. Inflation Become Harder to Forecast?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(s1), pages 3-33, February.
    7. Lars Peter Hansen & Thomas J. Sargent, 2013. "Recursive Models of Dynamic Linear Economies," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 10141.
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    Cited by:

    1. Galvao, Ana Beatriz & Mitchell, James, 2019. "Measuring Data Uncertainty : An Application using the Bank of England’s “Fan Charts” for Historical GDP Growth," EMF Research Papers 24, Economic Modelling and Forecasting Group.
    2. Mihaela-Eugenia VASILACHE, 2018. "Forecasting the Trend of Art Market," Computational Methods in Social Sciences (CMSS), "Nicolae Titulescu" University of Bucharest, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 6(1), pages 82-93, June.
    3. Galvao, Ana Beatriz & Mitchell, James, 2020. "Real-Time Perceptions of Historical GDP Data Uncertainty," EMF Research Papers 35, Economic Modelling and Forecasting Group.
    4. Zhang, Bo & Chan, Joshua C.C. & Cross, Jamie L., 2020. "Stochastic volatility models with ARMA innovations: An application to G7 inflation forecasts," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1318-1328.
    5. Tommaso Proietti, 2021. "Predictability, real time estimation, and the formulation of unobserved components models," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 433-454, April.
    6. Julien Champagne & Guillaume Poulin‐Bellisle & Rodrigo Sekkel, 2020. "Introducing the Bank of Canada staff economic projections database," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(1), pages 114-129, January.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    attention; internet search; Google; monetary policy; ECB; FED; international financial markets; macro-finance; sovereign bonds; international finance; bond markets; preferred habitat models.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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