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Educational expansion, intergenerational mobility and over-education

  • Montserrat Vilalta-Bufi(Universitat de Barcelona)
  • Ausias Ribo (Universitat de Barcelona)

    (Universitat de Barcelona)

There is a vast literature on intergenerational mobility in sociology and economics. Similar interest has emerged for the phenomenon of over-education in both disciplines. There are no studies, however, linking these two research lines. We study the relationship between social mobility and over-education in a context of educational expansion. Our framework allows for the evaluation of several policies, including those aecting social segregation, early intervention programs and the power of unions. Results show the evolution of social mobility, over-education, income inequality and equality of opportunity under each scenario.

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Paper provided by Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 284.

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Length: 0 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bar:bedcje:2012284
Contact details of provider: Postal: Espai de Recerca en Economia, Facultat de Ciències Econòmiques. Tinent Coronel Valenzuela, Num 1-11 08034 Barcelona. Spain.
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