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International Dimensions in the Financing of Higher Education

Author

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  • Bruce Chapman
  • Peter Tulip

Abstract

This chapter compares and contrasts international experience with respect to higher education financing. The size and payment forms of tuition, and the different types and levels of public sector support, are illustrated for a large number of countries. A major aspect of the discussion concerns the conceptual bases and the costs and benefits of the two different instruments of government intervention for student financing: guaranteed bank loans, and income contingent loans. It is argued that income contingent loans have a number of advantages over government guaranteed bank loans, and this seems to be increasingly recognised with respect to international adoption of the former. However, to be efficacious income contingent loan systems require sophisticated institutional and administrative repayment collection arrangements.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Chapman & Peter Tulip, 2008. "International Dimensions in the Financing of Higher Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 574, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:574
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/CEPR/DP574.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chapman, Bruce, 1997. "Conceptual Issues and the Australian Experience with Income Contingent Charges for Higher Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(442), pages 738-751, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cécile Hoareau, 2010. "FINANCING EU STUDENT MOBILITY: A Proposed Credit Union Scheme for Europe," University of California at Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education qt64r0t16d, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    government guaranteed bank loans; higher education; income contingent loans; student loans; tuition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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