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The changing influence of culture on job satisfaction across Europe: 1981-2008

Author

Listed:
  • Gail Pacheco

    (Department of Economics, Auckland University of Technology)

  • De Wet van der Westhuizen

    (Telecom, New Zealand.)

  • Don J. Webber

    (Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK)

Abstract

This paper contributes to the growing multi-disciplinary body of literature on subjective wellbeing by investigating the temporal stability and impacts of cultural values on job satisfaction over time. It is generally believed that cultural values evolve fairly slowly, leading to the expectation that the impacts of these values on job satisfaction are likely to be fairly stable over an individual’s working life. This paper uses four waves of the European Values Study and investigates whether cultural values have evolved and whether their impacts on job satisfaction have changed across Europe over the period 1981-2008. We parameterise cultural values through reference to traditional vs. secular and survival vs. self-expression value continuums. Results indicate that the strength of many cultural values have declined, the impacts of traditional values on job satisfaction have remained fairly constant, and the impacts of survival values on job satisfaction have declined substantially over the sample period.

Suggested Citation

  • Gail Pacheco & De Wet van der Westhuizen & Don J. Webber, 2012. "The changing influence of culture on job satisfaction across Europe: 1981-2008," Working Papers 2012-06, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201206
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gail Pacheco & Don J. Webber, 2010. "Participative decision making and job satisfaction," Working Papers 1014, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 135-141, May.
    3. Scott Fargher & Stefan Kesting & Thomas Lange & Gail Pacheco, 2008. "Cultural heritage and job satisfaction in Eastern and Western Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 29(7), pages 630-650, November.
    4. Judge, Timothy A. & Larsen, Randy J., 2001. "Dispositional Affect and Job Satisfaction: A Review and Theoretical Extension," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 67-98, September.
    5. De Wet van der Westhuizen & Gail Pacheco & Don J. Webber, 2010. "Culture, participative decision making and job satisfaction," Working Papers 1010, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J. & Warr, Peter B., 1994. "Is job satisfaction u-shaped in age ?," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9407, CEPREMAP.
    7. Riggle, Robert J. & Edmondson, Diane R. & Hansen, John D., 2009. "A meta-analysis of the relationship between perceived organizational support and job outcomes: 20 years of research," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(10), pages 1027-1030, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Culture; Job satisfaction.;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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