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Hong Kong - Shanghai Connect / Hong Kong - Beijing Disconnect (?), Scaling the Great Wall of Chinese Securities Trading Costs

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  • Ravi Kashyap

Abstract

We utilize a fundamentally different model of trading costs to look at the effect of the opening of the Hong Kong Shanghai Connect that links the stock exchanges in the two cities, arguably the biggest event in international business and finance since Christopher Columbus set sail for India. We design a novel methodology that compensates for the lack of data on trading costs in China. We estimate trading costs across similar positions on the dual listed set of securities in Hong Kong and China, hoping to provide useful pieces of information to help scale 'The Great Wall of Chinese Securities Trading Costs'. We then compare actual and estimated trading costs on a sample of real orders across the Hong Kong securities in the dual listed pair to establish the accuracy of our measurements. The primary question we seek to address is 'Which market would be better to trade to gain exposure to the same (or similar) set of securities or sectors?' We find that trading costs on Shanghai, which might have been lower than Hong Kong, might have become higher leading up to the Connect. What remains to be seen is whether this increase in trading costs is a temporary equilibrium due to the frenzy to gain exposure to Chinese securities or whether this phenomenon will persist once the two markets start becoming more and more tightly coupled. It would be interesting to see if this pioneering policy will lead to securities exchanges across the globe linking up one another, creating a trade anything, anywhere and anytime marketplace. Looking beyond mere trading costs, such studies can be used to gather some evidence on what effect the mode of governance and other aspects of life in one country have on another country, once they start joining up their financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Ravi Kashyap, 2016. "Hong Kong - Shanghai Connect / Hong Kong - Beijing Disconnect (?), Scaling the Great Wall of Chinese Securities Trading Costs," Papers 1603.01341, arXiv.org, revised May 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1603.01341
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ravi Kashyap, 2016. "Securities Lending Strategies: Valuation of Term Loans using Option Theory," Papers 1609.01274, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2018.

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