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Closed form solutions of measures of systemic risk


  • Manfred Jaeger-Ambrozewicz


This paper derives -- considering a Gaussian setting -- closed form solutions of the statistics that Adrian and Brunnermeier and Acharya et al. have suggested as measures of systemic risk to be attached to individual banks. The statistics equal the product of statistic specific Beta-coefficients with the mean corrected Value at Risk. Hence, the measures of systemic risks are closely related to well known concepts of financial economics. Another benefit of the analysis is that it is revealed how the concepts are related to each other. Also, it may be relatively easy to convince the regulators to consider a closed form solution, especially so if the statistics involved are well known and can easily be communicated to the financial community.

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  • Manfred Jaeger-Ambrozewicz, 2012. "Closed form solutions of measures of systemic risk," Papers 1211.4173,
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1211.4173

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2009. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2201-2238, June.
    2. repec:fip:fedhpr:y:2010:i:may:p:65-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gabriele Galati & Richhild Moessner, 2013. "Macroprudential Policy – A Literature Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(5), pages 846-878, December.
    4. Viral V. Acharya & Lasse H. Pedersen & Thomas Philippon & Matthew Richardson, 2010. "Measuring systemic risk," Working Paper 1002, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    5. Nikola Tarashev & Claudio Borio & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2010. "Attributing systemic risk to individual institutions," BIS Working Papers 308, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Chen Zhou, 2010. "Are Banks Too Big to Fail? Measuring Systemic Importance of Financial Institutions," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 6(34), pages 205-250, December.
    7. Mathias Drehmann & Nikola Tarashev, 2011. "Systemic importance: some simple indicators," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Castro, Carlos & Ferrari, Stijn, 2014. "Measuring and testing for the systemically important financial institutions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 1-14.

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