IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/aim/wpaimx/1423.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Matching with Phantoms

Author

Listed:

Abstract

Searching for partners involves informational persistence that reduces future traders' matching probability. In this paper, traders who are no longer available but who left tracks on the market are called phantoms. We examine a discrete-time matching market in which phantoms are a by-product of search activity, no coordination frictions are assumed, and non-phantom traders may lose time trying to match with phantoms. The resulting aggregate matching technology features increasing returns to scale in the short run, but has constant returns to scale in the long run. We embed this matching function in the canonical equilibrium search unemployment model. Although the model may feature sunspot fluctuations, its typical calibration on monthly US data displays the saddle-path property. The model predicts the same monthly job-finding probability and quarterly aggregate volatility as the standard model with a Cobb-Douglas matching function.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnaud Chéron & Bruno Decreuse, 2014. "Matching with Phantoms," AMSE Working Papers 1423, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France, revised Apr 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1423
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/sites/default/files/_dt/2012/wp_2014_-_nr_23.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    2. Ricardo Lagos, 2003. "An Analysis of the Market for Taxicab Rides in New York City," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 423-434, May.
    3. DREZE, Jacques & BEAN, Charles, 1990. "Europe's employment problem: Introduction and synthesis," LIDAM Discussion Papers CORE 1990041, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    4. Ricardo Lagos, 2000. "An Alternative Approach to Search Frictions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 851-873, October.
    5. Mortensen, Dale T, 1999. "Equilibrium Unemployment Dynamics," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(4), pages 889-914, November.
    6. R. Jackman & C. Pissarides, 1999. "On Vacancies (1989)," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Tackling Unemployment, chapter 5, pages 105-123, Palgrave Macmillan.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Matching with Phantoms
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2010-04-28 01:18:57

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bamieh, Omar & Ziegler, Lennart, 2020. "How Does the COVID-19 Crisis Affect Labor Demand? An Analysis Using Job Board Data From Austria," IZA Discussion Papers 13801, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Albrecht, James & Cai, Xiaoming & Gautier, Pieter & Vroman, Susan, 2020. "Multiple applications, competing mechanisms, and market power," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 190(C).
    3. Bhole, Monica & Fradkin, Andrey & Horton, John, 2021. "Information About Vacancy Competition Redirects Job Search," SocArXiv p82fk, Center for Open Science.
    4. Michèle Belot & Philipp Kircher & Paul Muller, 2018. "How Wage Announcements Affect Job Search - A Field Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 7302, CESifo.
    5. Stef Garasto & Jyldyz Djumalieva & Karlis Kanders & Rachel Wilcock & Cath Sleeman, 2021. "Developing experimental estimates of regional skill demand," Economic Statistics Centre of Excellence (ESCoE) Discussion Papers ESCoE DP-2021-02, Economic Statistics Centre of Excellence (ESCoE).
    6. He, Chuan & Mau, Karsten & Xu, Mingzhi, 2021. "Trade Shocks and Firms Hiring Decisions: Evidence from Vacancy Postings of Chinese Firms in the Trade War," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    7. Morgan Raux, 2021. "Looking for the “Best and Brightest": Hiring difficulties and high-skilled foreign workers," DEM Discussion Paper Series 21-05, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.
    8. Sushant Acharya & Shu Lin Wee, 2018. "Replacement hiring and the productivity-wage gap," Staff Reports 860, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    9. Acharya, Sushant & Wee, Shu Lin, 2020. "On-the-job Search and the Productivity-Wage Gap," CEPR Discussion Papers 14430, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Barinova Vera & Eremkin Vladimir & Mukhlisova Albina & Radnabazarova Sanda & Rybalkin Vyacheslav & Shestakov Viktor, "undated". "Infrastructure of Support on the Different Stages of Innovation Process: Detection of 'Bottlenecks' in Current Russian Practice and Suggestions for Improvement," Published Papers nvg117, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    11. Morgan Raux, 2019. "Looking for the "Best and Brightest": Hiring difficulties and high-skilled foreign workers," AMSE Working Papers 1934, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Giulia Brancaccio & Myrto Kalouptsidi & Theodore Papageorgiou, 2020. "Geography, Transportation, and Endogenous Trade Costs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(2), pages 657-691, March.
    2. Soheil Ghili & Vineet Kumar, 2020. "Spatial Distribution of Supply and the Role of Market Thickness: Theory and Evidence from Ride Sharing," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2219R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Aug 2020.
    3. Robert Shimer, 2007. "Mismatch," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(4), pages 1074-1101, September.
    4. Richard Rogerson & Robert Shimer & Randall Wright, 2004. "Search-Theoretic Models of the Labor Market-A Survey," NBER Working Papers 10655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Yang, Hai & Leung, Cowina W.Y. & Wong, S.C. & Bell, Michael G.H., 2010. "Equilibria of bilateral taxi-customer searching and meeting on networks," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(8-9), pages 1067-1083, September.
    6. Yang, Hai & Yang, Teng, 2011. "Equilibrium properties of taxi markets with search frictions," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 696-713, May.
    7. Theodore Papageorgiou & Myrto Kalouptsidi & Giulia Brancaccio, 2017. "Geography, Search Frictions and Trade Costs," 2017 Meeting Papers 1105, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Soheil Ghili, 2021. "Optimal Bundling: Characterization, Interpretation, and Implications for Empirical Work," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2273, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    9. Soheil Ghili & Vineet Kumar, 2020. "Spatial Distribution of Supply and the Role of Market Thickness: Theory and Evidence from Ride Sharing," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2219, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    10. Soheil Ghili & Vineet Kumar, 2021. "Spatial Distribution of Supply and the Role of Market Thickness: Theory and Evidence from Ride Sharing," Papers 2108.05954, arXiv.org.
    11. Brown, Alessio & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis, 2015. "An Incentive Theory Of Matching," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 643-668, April.
    12. Sniekers, F.J.T., 2013. "Endogenous Beveridge cycles and the volatility of unemployment," CeNDEF Working Papers 13-12, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    13. Jan Eeckhout & Ilse Lindenlaub, 2019. "Unemployment Cycles," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 175-234, October.
    14. Brancaccio, Giulia & Kalouptsidi, Myrto & Papageorgiou, Theodore, 2017. "Geography, Search Frictions and Endogenous Trade Costs," CEPR Discussion Papers 12141, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Ewa Gałecka-Burdziak, 2012. "Labour market matching – the case of Poland," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 43(3), pages 31-46.
    16. Gottfries, Nils & Stadin, Karolina, 2016. "The Matching Process:Search Or Mismatch?," Working Paper Series 2016:14, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    17. Yashiv, Eran, 2007. "Labor search and matching in macroeconomics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(8), pages 1859-1895, November.
    18. Carlos Usabiaga & Fernando Núñez & Pablo Álvarez de Toledo, 2013. "Segmentación del mercado de trabajo, clusters, movilidad y duración de desempleo con datos individuales," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2013/02, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    19. Lam, Chungsang Tom & Liu, Meng & Hui, Xiang, 2021. "The geography of ridesharing: A case study on New York City," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C).
    20. Neugart, Michael, 2006. "Labor market policy evaluation with an agent-based model," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2006-113, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    information persistence; endogenous matching function; business cycle;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1423. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/amseafr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Gregory Cornu (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/amseafr.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.