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Time Integration: Agribusiness Structure For Competitive Advantage

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  • Wilson, Paul N.
  • Thompson, Gary D.

Abstract

Traditional views and models of perishable food suppliers fail to capture the fundamental role of time integration in firm-level organization. A two-phase research design of major grower-shipper firms of lettuce, tomatoes, and melons reveals a diverse distribution of firms across the time-integration continuum. Most firms use more than one microclimate to extend product availability. Decision makers are encouraged to understand the implications of these temporally integrated organizations on agricultural and trade policy. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • Wilson, Paul N. & Thompson, Gary D., 2001. "Time Integration: Agribusiness Structure For Competitive Advantage," 2001 Annual Meeting, July 8-11, 2001, Logan, Utah 36100, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:waealo:36100
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/36100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Calvin, Linda & Cook, Roberta L. & Denbaly, Mark & Dimitri, Carolyn & Glaser, Lewrene K. & Handy, Charles R. & Jekanowski, Mark D. & Kaufman, Phillip R. & Krissoff, Barry & Thompson, Gary D. & Thornsb, 2001. "U.S. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Marketing: Emerging Trade Practices, Trends, and Issues," Agricultural Economics Reports 33915, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Kaufman, Phillip R. & Handy, Charles R. & McLaughlin, Edward W. & Park, Kristen & Green, Geoffrey M., 2000. "Understanding The Dynamics Of Produce Markets: Consumption And Consolidation Grow," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33747, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Gary D. Thompson & Paul N. Wilson, 1997. "The organizational structure of the North American fresh tomato market: Implications for seasonal trade disputes," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 533-547.
    4. Richard J. Sexton, 2000. "Industrialization and Consolidation in the U.S. Food Sector: Implications for Competition and Welfare," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1087-1104.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tadesse, Dawit & Blank, Steven C., 2003. "Cultivar Diversity: A Neglected Risk Management Strategy," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(02), August.

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    Keywords

    Agribusiness;

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